Firefighter Safety: Type V Double Roof

By Scott Weir

As of recently, our engine companies started to assist the new construction and annual inspections. Having the companies assist the inspections has its positives and negatives. One of the positive things of doing these inspections is having our firefighters get out and see what type of construction is in their district.

The other day we were scheduled to do a rough inspection on an addition to a Type V house. When we arrived, we found that the homeowner was constructing a two-room addition with an entryway. This addition would be added onto the front side of their house. As we stepped out of the truck we noticed that the builder had built a roof on top of a roof.

Firefighter Safety and Construction: Type V Double Roof

(Picture 1)

Picture 1 shows the outside of the existing house and the addition being built.

Firefighter Safety and Construction: Type V Double Roof

(Picture 2)

Picture 2 shows the outside of the house with the old roof line still intact and the new roof line built over top of it. When the house is finished, siding will be put to the new roofline and you will be unable to see the old roof.

Firefighter Safety and Construction: Type V Double Roof

(Picture 3)

Picture 3 is the view from inside the bedroom. At the top of the picture you will notice the old roof with the shingles still attached. The builder left the old roof in place and cut out slots for the new trusses to butt up with the old ones. This roof will remain and place and be part of the attic.

Firefighter Safety and Construction: Type V Double Roof

(Picture 4)

Picture 4 is a view from standing in the new entryway. At the top of the picture you will notice the gable is still intact from the existing part of the home. As with the rest of the roof, this part will stay intact and will be enclosed in the attic space.

This double roof is likely to cause several problems for firefighters. Firefighters will run into issues with ventilation, collapse, and fire spread.

If your companies do not get out and actively survey your area and assist in inspections, I encourage you to do so and share unusual findings with everyone! It may save a life some day!

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