THE IMPORTANCE OF THE INITIAL ON-SCENE REPORT

07/01/2001
BY NICK BRUNACINIIt is a lovely day. You are at work and have just relieved the off-going shift. You have put your turnouts on the apparatus, checked out your equipment, and made your way into the fire station for some caffeine and morning fellowship. Your morning ritual is punctuated by Mabel in Alarm. She is pushing the button that activates 100,000 watts of lights that is accompanied by the 140-decibel "tone" that sounds like it is straight out of a World War II German submarine movie. Mabel waits momentarily, then announces that Engines 1 and 6, Ladder 4, and BC7 are being sent to a structure fire. Mabel provides the address and radio channel and then bids all a fond farewell. Everyon...

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