http://localhost:4503/content/fe/en/blogs/blognetwork/nick-martin.html2016-10-05T00:17:37.283ZCombat Ready FirefightingAdobe Experience ManagerMotivationnoemail@noemail.orgNickOn the truck today I have a guy who's newer on the job and regularly assigned to an engine. After about an hour of drilling on portable ladders and forcible entry he said to me "Sarge, I just don't wanna let anyone down..." Probably one of the best things I've ever heard a fireman say. <br /><br />I told him "well if you start with that everyday, that will give you motivation and the rest will quickly fall in line with practice". Sometimes it's just that simple - his motivation inspired me. <br /><br />This is a team sport. We're all counting on you to be in the right spot, with the right stuff, and the right skills, at the right time. We can't let anyone down. <br /><br />Combat Ready. <br /><div class="separator"style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-__0b9W5jMgY/T2DOS1KeH7I/AAAAAAAAA1Y/Xq58pQVsYvo/s640/blogger-image-174258717.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" src="https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-__0b9W5jMgY/T2DOS1KeH7I/AAAAAAAAA1Y/Xq58pQVsYvo/s640/blogger-image-174258717.jpg" /></a></div><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/9049491352093978807-1053954406232162173?l=fe-nick-martin.blogspot.com' alt='' /></div>tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-9049491352093978807.post-10539544062321621732012-03-14T16:58:00.001Z2012-03-15T14:00:46.320ZTriad Locks & "To Shock or Not to Shock"noemail@noemail.orgNickSize-up is the first step of forcible entry for a reason - <strong><span style="color: blue;">without a thoughtful size-up, proper selection of the appropriate tools and techniques is left to be a matter of luck rather than an informed decision.</span></strong> &nbsp;Unfortunately, size-up at a fire door is under less than ideal conditions - stress, smoke, adrenalin and more all tend to decrease our attention to detail, it's likely that something could be overlooked. &nbsp;With this in mind, we should all seek to keep our eyes open on "routine" calls, noting the types of forcible entry challenges common in our box alarm districts. &nbsp;The more we fill our heads with scenarios we've seen and the more we think above possible solutions in advance, the more likely it is that we will have a solution at the fire door.<br /><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-hqN-whK9_mU/TwMDfa5O69I/AAAAAAAAA0g/0Bmwckr4x74/s1600/blogger-image--1028446109.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-hqN-whK9_mU/TwMDfa5O69I/AAAAAAAAA0g/0Bmwckr4x74/s320/blogger-image--1028446109.jpg" width="240" /></a>While on a routine run on the engine, I observed this apartment door.&nbsp; This is a lock that has become common in many of our housing projects and is a <a href="http://www.mul-t-lock.com/res/English_Product_files/Multi_Point_Locks_and_Accessories/Multi-Point%20Locks/mpl415.pdf" target="_blank">"triad" style lock manufactured by Mul-T Lock Company</a>.&nbsp;&nbsp;<strong><em>These locks secure not only into the side of the frame, but into the top and bottom of the frame as well.</em></strong>&nbsp; On the side, the door locks into the frame with a 3-pin style deadbolt.&nbsp; This shouldn't be much more difficult to defeat than a standard deadbolt-ed door.&nbsp; What will add additional challenge is that pins go into the top and bottom of the frame.&nbsp; These pins are a substantial solid metal and go about 1/2" to 3/4" deep.&nbsp; I found that the bottom pin doesn't always seat fully due to debris accumulating in the floor-level hole. The entire mechanism operates off of the cylinder key - both pins and deadbolt operate simultaneously.&nbsp; The handle is&nbsp;always&nbsp;unlocked and operates a slam latch only.&nbsp; If you are not aware of the presence of this lock style before the fire, it offers little outside evidence.&nbsp; The only thing you might notice is the label "Mul-T Lock" that is sometimes stamped on the lock cylinder.&nbsp; <br /><br /><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="float: right;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-ecX5zoKMf_Q/Tu-M-dzZ3-I/AAAAAAAAA0A/mibgtVhm-Lk/s1600/IMG_1525.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="clear: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="240" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-ecX5zoKMf_Q/Tu-M-dzZ3-I/AAAAAAAAA0A/mibgtVhm-Lk/s320/IMG_1525.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Sorry for the dark image.&nbsp; This is the pin on the top of the door, the receiving hole can be seen toward the top right.</td></tr></tbody></table><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-Il25NttvnLg/Tu-Lrwy9m6I/AAAAAAAAAzo/iqflM2oO0C4/s1600/IMG_1521.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-Il25NttvnLg/Tu-Lrwy9m6I/AAAAAAAAAzo/iqflM2oO0C4/s320/IMG_1521.jpg" width="240" /></a></div>Initial techniques of forcing the deadbolt area either conventionally (irons) or with a hydraulic FE tool should work well.&nbsp; <strong><span style="color: red;">The only issue is that if you have a good fire/smoke condition behind the door and you force the middle of the door first, you will deal with these conditions venting in your face&nbsp;while forcing the top and bottom after you discover they are locked as well</span></strong>.&nbsp; You will also be a little wore out&nbsp;and now have to work above your shoulders to force the top. &nbsp;Similarly to cutting a vertical ventilation hole, it would be better if we can work from the top down so our next work area is not in the venting conditions.<br /><br />In our&nbsp;forcible entry programs, we teach the "<strong><u>SHOCK-GAP-SET-FORCE</u></strong>" method for inward opening doors.&nbsp; The first step, SHOCK, sometimes meets with some controversy&nbsp;and is thought by some to not be necessary.&nbsp; "Shocking" the door is essentially striking it in a battering fashion with the Halligan bar.&nbsp; For the few seconds it takes, I&nbsp;find it to be very useful.&nbsp; A couple tips:<br /><ul><li><em>Understand that the shock may force the door if it is weak, be prepared to control it.</em></li><li><em>Shock from the protected side of the door whenever possible, avoid having your body in front of the door in case it opens.</em></li><li><em>DO NOT place your hand over the end of the tool - force can travel back and injure your hand.&nbsp; Grasp along the shaft.</em></li><li><em>My preference is to shock with the head of the Halligan on wood doors and the fork on metal doors to avoid getting the fork stuck like a javelin in wood doors (lesson learned).</em></li><li><em>When shocking with the fork, keep the adz/pick rotated away from your face while shocking.</em></li></ul><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><object width="320" height="266" class="BLOGGER-youtube-video" classid="clsid:D27CDB6E-AE6D-11cf-96B8-444553540000" codebase="http://download.macromedia.com/pub/shockwave/cabs/flash/swflash.cab#version=6,0,40,0" data-thumbnail-src="http://3.gvt0.com/vi/11PofrV12yc/0.jpg"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/11PofrV12yc&fs=1&source=uds" /><param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /><embed width="320" height="266" src="http://www.youtube.com/v/11PofrV12yc&fs=1&source=uds" type="application/x-shockwave-flash"></embed></object></div>**<em>Note in the above video, the student was not able to actually shock high and low due to the prop door not being reinforced in that area.</em><br /><br />Using the above techniques, our first step (after size-up) is to shock the door <strong>HIGH-MIDDLE-LOW</strong>, once each, in that order - AND HARD.&nbsp; <strong><span style="color: blue;">This has a few functions: size-up for additional locks, and breaking things up a little so that our next step (GAP) will be easier to achieve</span></strong>.&nbsp; Without a good shock, I often see people needing to "tap the adz" into position with the axe before being able to gap.&nbsp; But I've found that with a good shock, you often get enough of a space to easily slide the adz in for the gap.&nbsp; For those of you who may like to kick a door, a good shock is just as much force as kicking - except you won't damage your knee or&nbsp;punch your foot through into the fire room and get it stuck (seen that), and you'll have the Halligan in your hand already&nbsp;when it doesn't work.&nbsp; <strong>As we SHOCK the door, we should be <u>feeling</u> for the feedback in the bar&nbsp;- is it rigid, or is there some bounce?&nbsp; </strong>Bounce will indicate that there are not locks in that area while a solid feel should cause us to consider there might be additional locking mechanisms in the area and we may need to modify our approach to address them.&nbsp; <br /><br />It's&nbsp;the first here, finding additional locks,&nbsp;which has the most bearing on this triad lock situation.&nbsp; So in this scenario we come up to the door, it's a fire so we're a little amped up and maybe there is some smoke in the hall.&nbsp; We see the fairly standard looking deadbolt/slam-latch assembly and think it's normal business.&nbsp;<strong><span style="color: red;"><u>Instead our shock is solid both high and low</u>.&nbsp; What does this tell us?&nbsp; There is some type of lock both&nbsp;high and low, as well as the one in the&nbsp;<span style="background-color: white;">middle that we already&nbsp;knew about.</span></span></strong>&nbsp; Maybe this clues us in to it being a triad lock, maybe it turns out to be slidebolts mounted on the back of the door, maybe something else.&nbsp; What it should do is cause us to modify the rest of our approach to start HIGH and work down the door rather than in the middle.&nbsp; Doing so will keep us out of conditions that may begin to vent.&nbsp; Further, it is more difficult to work high (above your shoulders) so let's do that early while we're more physically fresh.&nbsp; In this scenario forcing the pins and the deadbolt can be done with the irons, though the hydra-ram might be a good choice if available due to the multiple mechanisms, one of which being kind of high.&nbsp; Another option, depending on circumstances, might be to try to pull the lock cylinder and go through the lock to un-lock it.<br /><br />Of course our best weapon is always strong <strong>COMBAT READY</strong> knowledge of our box alarm area that might lead to us already knowing the types of locks common in certain buildings.&nbsp; Second to that, the methodical "SHOCK-GAP-SET-FORCE" approach will assist not only in providing progressive force to the door, making each subsequent step easier, but a good SHOCK as our first step has the added benefit of being an additional tool to size-up the door's challenges.<div class="blogger-post-footer"><img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/9049491352093978807-2807180945363244566?l=fe-nick-martin.blogspot.com' alt='' /></div>tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-9049491352093978807.post-28071809453632445662012-01-03T14:26:00.000Z2012-03-15T14:00:45.981ZNew UL Study Reinforces Sound Old Fire Tacticsnoemail@noemail.orgNickI can be a pretty skeptical guy when it comes to new studies and ideas in the fire service. &nbsp;That's because it seems that lately our profession tries to solve "hands-on problems" with fancy new catch-phrases rather than firefighting skill. &nbsp;So when I read and watched the recently released&nbsp;"Impact of Ventilation on Fire Behavior in Legacy and Contemporary Residential Construction" released by Underwriter's Laboratories I was on watch for what "zany solution" they were going to have for our "modern fire problem". &nbsp;I was pleasantly surprised.<br /><br />The study was released in December 2010 and I've heard quite a bit about it in the background of the fire service. &nbsp;This study has been referenced in a lot of circles recently. &nbsp;One "fire chief" tried to even use it to say we shouldn't fight fires interior anymore (he must've not read the same piece I read). &nbsp;Not wanting to remain uninformed, I took a look... &nbsp;For all those who don't like reading 400 page reports, I suffered for you. &nbsp;And here's the FIREMAN's version:<br /><br /><b><u>Summary:</u></b><br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-wzUYEg5uL6A/TtUsyvwkgxI/AAAAAAAAAxs/J45QygWHC2Y/s1600/DSC_0520.JPG.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-wzUYEg5uL6A/TtUsyvwkgxI/AAAAAAAAAxs/J45QygWHC2Y/s320/DSC_0520.JPG.jpg" width="208" /></a></div>The study compared a series of residential fires in a 50's-60's construction style 1-story house of 1,200 square feet with a "modern" 3,200 square foot 2 story house. &nbsp; These are those new houses we hear about being so different in "today's fires", referenced by many who advocate we completely change our approach to firefighting.<br /><br />Now I was not one of the scientists on the study, but I did look at it fairly closely and here are my take home thoughts on what it means for fighting fires in "today's fires":<br /><br /><ol><li><b><span class="Apple-style-span" style="color: red;">Coordinate ventilation with hoseline advancement, including forcing doors that feed the fire area.</span></b></li><li><b><span class="Apple-style-span" style="color: red;">Get a hoseline on the seat of the fire quick.</span></b></li><li><b><span class="Apple-style-span" style="color: red;">VES is a great technique.</span></b></li><li><b><span class="Apple-style-span" style="color: red;">Closing interior doors saves civilians and firefighters.</span></b></li><li><b><span class="Apple-style-span" style="color: red;">No smoke showing means NOTHING.</span></b></li></ol><div>That's it? &nbsp;Yeah - pretty much, at least from my perspective. &nbsp;Now there's a lot of "why" that supports those conclusions. &nbsp;But what shocked me there is - did you hear anything NEW? &nbsp;I didn't. &nbsp;No new safety vests, no blitz-fires, no buzz terms. &nbsp;Coordinate engine &amp; truck work, get a line in place fast, and use good techniques to isolate and rescue. &nbsp;Sounds like the same things the "old school" fire service has preached for decades!</div><div><br /></div><div><b><u>So what's the problem?</u></b></div><div><b><u><br /></u></b></div><div>The problem is the same thing I started this article with: &nbsp;these days we'd rather get a new colored vest, or practice taking blood pressures, or use some fancy multi-syllable phrase than do what this study supports: &nbsp;GET GOOD AT OFFENSIVE FIREFIGHTING. &nbsp;What do I mean? &nbsp;Here are some buzz-words I think we ought to be practicing, and this fancy 400-page study <b><u>supports</u></b>:</div><div><br /></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-lZM-6BbA-8I/TtUtNZ3ijFI/AAAAAAAAAx0/U4AH3jN_exg/s1600/IMG_0188+1.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;"><img border="0" height="238" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-lZM-6BbA-8I/TtUtNZ3ijFI/AAAAAAAAAx0/U4AH3jN_exg/s320/IMG_0188+1.jpg" width="320" /></a></div><div>- &nbsp;"<b><span class="Apple-style-span" style="color: blue;">Running Hoselines</span></b>" - that's a geographical term in my area for stretching and operating interior attack lines. &nbsp;How often to your firefighters pull lines? &nbsp;I'd bet you many firefighters haven't pulled a line off in a "non-parking-lot" scenario in the past year. &nbsp;THAT'S A BREAD &amp; BUTTER SKILL! &nbsp;Do they just know the crossly or can they extend and adapt to various scenarios with the precision of a offensive football line under the 2-minute warning? &nbsp;What is your fire department's benchmark time for: &nbsp;from arrival having to firefighters stretch a 1.75" line to the front door and be masked up and ready to enter the fire area? &nbsp;Based on a survey of YouTube I don't think many departments have ANY such benchmark. &nbsp;This study says you have between <b>100 and 200 <u>seconds</u>&nbsp;to get water on the fire after ventilation occurs. &nbsp;</b>That means you ventilating, or the fire ventilating the windows for you. &nbsp;How good are your back up firefighters? &nbsp;How well do you chase kinks? &nbsp;Poor performance with either of those will drastically delay your fire attack and your flow.</div><div><br /></div><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-PgSJKAbRvi8/TtUp-N6aF-I/AAAAAAAAAxc/3ilb5QAieLM/s1600/Tenebility.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="255" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-PgSJKAbRvi8/TtUp-N6aF-I/AAAAAAAAAxc/3ilb5QAieLM/s320/Tenebility.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><u>You have 100-200 seconds after ventilation to put the fire out or suffer rapid fire growth.</u></td></tr></tbody></table><div>- &nbsp;"<b><span class="Apple-style-span" style="color: blue;">Coordinated Ventilation</span></b>" - a concept that many departments struggle with. &nbsp;This was a no-brainer "back in the day". &nbsp;We need to spend more time training on coordinating the location and timing of ventilation. &nbsp;This study clearly showed the impact of ventilating in the wrong time or in the wrong place. &nbsp;Ventilation should be timed with the knowledge that you only have 100-200 seconds after to get water on the fire before the fire will rapidly grow. &nbsp;The best way we can do this is "run scenarios". &nbsp;Look at fire pictures with your crew. &nbsp;Where would you ventilate? When? What would be the challenges? &nbsp;How about coordinating with the line? &nbsp;You can just wait and see what happens when you get a fire, or you can take a few minutes to TALK FIRE and PREPARE so you'll KNOW what's going to happen.<br /><br /></div><div>- "<b><span class="Apple-style-span" style="color: blue;">Vent, Enter, Search</span></b>" - this study also clearly showed that these fires were survivable for civilians who were laying on the floor in just about every room of the house except for the fire room. &nbsp;Closing the door made things even better. &nbsp;Keeping this in mind, along with the rapid growth of fire if water is not supplied, further supports the efficiency of Vent, Enter, Search technique in rescuing civilians. Particularly where a larger square foot home delays searches done with the conventional "left right" patterns. &nbsp;Some advocate it should be "Vent, Enter, Isolate, Search" - maybe, but when I first learned VES, and every time I've taught it, closing the door has ALWAYS been the first action after you enter. &nbsp;Maybe some people were just teaching it wrong...</div><div><br /></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-W6ZTL-GOM5Q/TtUqNF6eO2I/AAAAAAAAAxk/4M-q0SNbLxA/s1600/Untitled.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="211" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-W6ZTL-GOM5Q/TtUqNF6eO2I/AAAAAAAAAxk/4M-q0SNbLxA/s320/Untitled.jpg" width="320" /></a></div><div><br /></div><div>- &nbsp;"<b><span class="Apple-style-span" style="color: blue;">Isolate and flow water</span></b>" - In trouble? &nbsp;Either get out, isolate yourself (close a door), or flow water. &nbsp;This study supports the tenability of firefighters when we knock down fire with a hoseline or isolate ourselves from the fire until the fire is knocked or we can obtain an exit. &nbsp;</div><div><br /></div><div>- "<b><span class="Apple-style-span" style="color: blue;">Nothing Showing Means Nothing</span>" </b>- Among others, I've said it for years. &nbsp;Three of the worst fires of my career started out as "nothing showing". &nbsp;That's when everyone let's their guard down, doesn't want to lay lines, leaves their tools behind, and moves slow. &nbsp;When you have fire showing - you know its a fire. &nbsp;When you have nothing showing - THE FIRE WILL CATCH YOU OFF GUARD. &nbsp;This study reinforces that with our modern construction, it is quite likely that a good fire will show nothing to the outside until it is ventilated. &nbsp;KEEP YOUR GUARD UP - IT'S THE FIRE OF YOUR CAREER UNTIL PROVEN OTHERWISE.</div><div><br /></div><div><b><u>In Conclusion:</u></b></div><div><b><u><br /></u></b></div><div>There's a lot more to it than that, and if you've got about an hour the video on it is worth watching. &nbsp;But the take home here is NOT that we need to re-invent the fire service. &nbsp;It seems to me that often we'd rather float lofty ideas in the air conditioning then get out there and WORK at improving our bread &amp; butter firefighting skills. &nbsp;Not running much fire? &nbsp;The need is even greater. &nbsp;<b>We need to go back to practicing the tried &amp; true skills of coordinated engine/truck work, rapid hoseline advancement, and targeted search.</b>&nbsp; Stop creating fancy buzz terms and get out their and train. &nbsp;Think fire, talk fire, run through scenarios. &nbsp;Stay sharp. &nbsp;Stay COMBAT READY.</div><div><br /></div><div><i>Referenced Study information:</i></div><div><i><br /></i></div><div><i><a href="http://www.ul.com/global/eng/pages/offerings/industries/buildingmaterials/fire/fireservice/ventilation/" target="_blank">UL | Impact of Ventilation on Fire Behavior in Legacy and Contemporary Residential Construction</a></i></div><div><br /></div><div><i><a href="http://content.learnshare.com/courses/73/306714/player.html" target="_blank">Video Summary of Report (70 minutes)</a></i></div><div><br /></div><div><br /></div><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/9049491352093978807-1942723157002835932?l=fe-nick-martin.blogspot.com' alt='' /></div>tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-9049491352093978807.post-19427231570028359322011-11-29T19:13:00.000Z2012-03-15T14:00:46.636ZWhat is a "combat ready" engine company?noemail@noemail.orgNick<div style="font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', 'Bitstream Charter', Times, serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;">Tim Linke from Lincoln, NE sent me this basic but thought provoking inquiry. &nbsp;We all talk about being "combat ready". &nbsp;Weather you use that particular term or not, if you're reading this you're probably interested in being your best, A+ performances all the time, etc...</div><div style="font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', 'Bitstream Charter', Times, serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;"><br /></div><div style="font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', 'Bitstream Charter', Times, serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;"><em><strong>So for those of us in an engine company -&nbsp;<span data-mce-style="color: #0000ff;" style="color: blue;">WHAT IS COMBAT READY</span>?</strong></em></div><div data-mce-style="text-align: center;" style="font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', 'Bitstream Charter', Times, serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px; text-align: center;"><em><strong><img alt="dcfd" class="alignnone size-medium wp-image-881" data-mce-src="http://traditionstraining.wordpress.com/files/2008/12/dcfd.jpg?w=300" height="134" src="http://traditionstraining.wordpress.com/files/2008/12/dcfd.jpg?w=300" style="border-bottom-width: 0px; border-color: initial; border-left-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-top-width: 0px;" title="dcfd" width="180" />&nbsp;&nbsp;<img alt="dsc02735" class="alignnone size-medium wp-image-882" data-mce-src="http://traditionstraining.wordpress.com/files/2008/12/dsc02735.jpg?w=300" height="128" src="http://traditionstraining.wordpress.com/files/2008/12/dsc02735.jpg?w=300" style="border-bottom-width: 0px; border-color: initial; border-left-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-top-width: 0px;" title="dsc02735" width="210" /></strong></em></div><div style="font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', 'Bitstream Charter', Times, serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;"><em><strong><img alt="" class="mceWPmore mceItemNoResize" data-mce-src="http://traditionstraining.wordpress.com/wp-includes/js/tinymce/plugins/wordpress/img/trans.gif" src="http://traditionstraining.wordpress.com/wp-includes/js/tinymce/plugins/wordpress/img/trans.gif" style="background-attachment: initial; background-clip: initial; background-color: transparent; background-image: url(http://traditionstraining.wordpress.com/wp-includes/js/tinymce/plugins/wordpress/img/more_bug.gif); background-origin: initial; background-position: 100% 0%; background-repeat: no-repeat no-repeat; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-color: initial; border-color: initial; border-left-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-style: initial; border-top-color: rgb(204, 204, 204); border-top-style: dotted; border-top-width: 1px; display: block; height: 12px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; margin-top: 15px; width: 495px;" title="More..." /></strong></em></div><div style="font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', 'Bitstream Charter', Times, serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;">This is quite an extensive topic, so here are a few of my first thoughts. &nbsp;I'm sure this will lead to a few more posts expanding on these thoughts, and hopefully some comments from everyone else on what they think a "combat ready" crew should focus on.</div><div style="font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', 'Bitstream Charter', Times, serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;"><br /></div><div style="font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', 'Bitstream Charter', Times, serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;"><strong><span data-mce-style="color: #ff0000;" style="color: red;">First - EVERY ALARM IS THE "FIRE OF YOUR CAREER" UNTIL YOU PROVE OTHERWISE,&nbsp;</span><em><span data-mce-style="color: #ff0000;" style="color: red;"><span data-mce-style="text-decoration: underline;" style="text-decoration: underline;">ACT ACCORDINGLY</span>.<span data-mce-style="font-weight: normal; font-style: normal;" style="font-style: normal; font-weight: normal;">&nbsp;&nbsp;<span data-mce-style="color: #000000;" style="color: black;"><em><span data-mce-style="color: #0000ff;" style="color: blue;">There are babies trapped, everyone's counting on you, you're actions will make or break this fire.</span></em><span data-mce-style="color: #0000ff;" style="color: blue;">&nbsp;&nbsp;If you take every action with these thoughts in mind, it doesn't matter if they're true or not - you'll be performing at your best.</span></span></span></span></em></strong></div><div style="font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', 'Bitstream Charter', Times, serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;"><strong><em><span data-mce-style="color: #ff0000;" style="color: red;"><span data-mce-style="font-weight: normal; font-style: normal;" style="font-style: normal; font-weight: normal;"><span data-mce-style="color: #000000;" style="color: black;"><span data-mce-style="color: #0000ff;" style="color: blue;"><br /></span></span></span></span></em></strong></div><div style="font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', 'Bitstream Charter', Times, serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;"><em><strong>A quality engine is nothing without a quality crew. &nbsp;<span data-mce-style="font-style: normal; font-weight: normal;" style="font-style: normal; font-weight: normal;">It seems like an obvious statement, but the rig doesn't put out the fire - you do. &nbsp;So what are the essential skills for an engine crew? &nbsp;</span></strong></em><strong>Come off dressed, with firefighting gloves on.</strong>&nbsp;&nbsp;I see guys getting off with no gloves, leather gloves, or rescue gloves. &nbsp;What are you going to do with that? &nbsp;Any fire worth anything is going to burn the hell out of you if you're not wearing the correct gloves. &nbsp;Oh, you'll put them on when it's time? &nbsp;As stupid as it sounds - putting a pair of gloves on can take up to 30 seconds. Try telling the father in the front yard who's screaming about his trapped kids to "hang on a sec"... &nbsp;You had that whole response time to get dressed, NOW is not the time for it.</div><div style="font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', 'Bitstream Charter', Times, serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;"><br /></div><div style="font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', 'Bitstream Charter', Times, serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;">In my opninon, when you come off the rig it is TIME TO WORK. &nbsp; Your hands will be pulling line, maybe forcing a door, whatever. &nbsp;If you rip you fingernail off, cut your wrist, or break your finger because you didn't have gloves on, YOU ARE OUT OF THE GAME. &nbsp;</div><div class="mceTemp mceIEcenter" style="font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', 'Bitstream Charter', Times, serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px; text-align: center;"><br /><dl class="wp-caption aligncenter" data-mce-style="width: 310px;" id="attachment_883" style="background-color: #f3f3f3; border-bottom-color: rgb(221, 221, 221); border-bottom-left-radius: 3px 3px; border-bottom-right-radius: 3px 3px; border-bottom-style: solid; border-bottom-width: 1px; border-left-color: rgb(221, 221, 221); border-left-style: solid; border-left-width: 1px; border-right-color: rgb(221, 221, 221); border-right-style: solid; border-right-width: 1px; border-top-color: rgb(221, 221, 221); border-top-left-radius: 3px 3px; border-top-right-radius: 3px 3px; border-top-style: solid; border-top-width: 1px; display: block; margin-bottom: 10px; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; margin-top: 10px; padding-top: 4px; text-align: center; width: 310px;"><dt class="wp-caption-dt"><img alt="Nobody wants to wait for you. Be ready!" class="size-medium wp-image-883" data-mce-src="http://traditionstraining.wordpress.com/files/2008/12/119246_orig.jpg?w=300" height="200" src="http://traditionstraining.wordpress.com/files/2008/12/119246_orig.jpg?w=300" style="border-bottom-style: none; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-color: initial; border-color: initial; border-left-style: none; border-left-width: 0px; border-right-style: none; border-right-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-top-style: none; border-top-width: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-top: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-top: 0px;" title="119246_orig" width="300" /></dt><dd class="wp-caption-dd" style="font-size: 11px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-top: 0px; padding-bottom: 5px; padding-left: 4px; padding-right: 4px; padding-top: 0px;">Nobody wants to wait for you. Be ready!</dd></dl></div><div style="font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', 'Bitstream Charter', Times, serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;">Oh you can't work well in your gloves? &nbsp;Poor dexterity? &nbsp;SUCK IT UP. &nbsp;Practice. &nbsp;Get different gloves. &nbsp;Soak your gloves and let them dry on your hands. &nbsp;Whatever you need to do - it is not impossible to mask up, tie nots, or do anything else wearing firefighting gloves. &nbsp;If you can't, its because you haven't tried/practiced hard enough.</div><div style="font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', 'Bitstream Charter', Times, serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;"><br /></div><div style="font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', 'Bitstream Charter', Times, serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;"><strong>Mask up at the fire entrance quickly</strong>. &nbsp;I am NOT a fan of coming off the rig with your face piece on. &nbsp;After my tirade about gloves, you may wonder why. When you're stretching lines, you need to be able to see where you are going. &nbsp;At night, in poor weather, or when stretching over long distances the face mask reduces your vision - even more so if it starts fogging up. &nbsp;You may not know the obstacles you'll encounter during your stretch until you encounter them, so you need to be able to see.</div><div style="font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', 'Bitstream Charter', Times, serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;"><img alt="dsc_0527" class="aligncenter size-medium wp-image-884" data-mce-src="http://traditionstraining.wordpress.com/files/2008/12/dsc_0527.jpg?w=248" height="300" src="http://traditionstraining.wordpress.com/files/2008/12/dsc_0527.jpg?w=248" style="border-bottom-width: 0px; border-color: initial; border-left-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-top-width: 0px; display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="dsc_0527" width="248" /></div><div style="font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', 'Bitstream Charter', Times, serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;"><br /></div><div style="font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', 'Bitstream Charter', Times, serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;">When we encounter smoke, it's time to mask up. &nbsp;A "combat ready" crew should be able to do this in under 30 seconds.</div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><object width="320" height="266" class="BLOGGER-youtube-video" classid="clsid:D27CDB6E-AE6D-11cf-96B8-444553540000" codebase="http://download.macromedia.com/pub/shockwave/cabs/flash/swflash.cab#version=6,0,40,0" data-thumbnail-src="http://i.ytimg.com/vi/S4XcmqP9KOI/0.jpg"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/S4XcmqP9KOI?version=3&f=user_uploads&c=google-webdrive-0&app=youtube_gdata" /><param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /><embed width="320" height="266" src="http://www.youtube.com/v/S4XcmqP9KOI?version=3&f=user_uploads&c=google-webdrive-0&app=youtube_gdata" type="application/x-shockwave-flash"></embed></object></div><div data-mce-style="text-align: center;" style="font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', 'Bitstream Charter', Times, serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px; text-align: left;"><br /></div><div data-mce-style="text-align: center;" style="font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', 'Bitstream Charter', Times, serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px; text-align: left;">The firefighter in that video is a probationer with about 5 months in the fire service, no prior experience, no other training than the academy. &nbsp;After about 10 minutes of mentoring, as you can see, he can go from dressed to masked-up in about 15 seconds. &nbsp;Trust me, if HE can do it - so can YOU... PRACTICE.</div><div data-mce-style="text-align: center;" style="font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', 'Bitstream Charter', Times, serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px; text-align: left;"><br /></div><div style="font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', 'Bitstream Charter', Times, serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;"><em>Setup the rig for your first due.</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;Your engine should be setup to reflect your typical manpower and the buildings &amp; challenges in your first due area. &nbsp;Many departments operate with the same setup they had 50 years ago, "just because", or emulate the setups of other fire departments. &nbsp;Borrowing ideas from other places is great - IF THAT IDEA FITS YOUR FIRST-DUE. &nbsp;But if you're running a pumper/tanker setup in an area with McMansions, what a FDNY engine in the Bronx has on it is probably irrelevant to you.</div><div style="font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', 'Bitstream Charter', Times, serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;"><br /></div><div style="font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', 'Bitstream Charter', Times, serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;"><strong>Attack lines should be quick/easy to pull and VERSATILE.</strong>&nbsp;&nbsp;Attack lines should ideally be at shoulder height on the rig. &nbsp;I shouldn't have to climb a ladder to pull a crosslay. &nbsp;We should know how to use the limited lines we have to accomplish multiple evolutions such as extending lines, covering long distances, well stretches, window stretches, etc...</div><div style="font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', 'Bitstream Charter', Times, serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;"><br /></div><div style="font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', 'Bitstream Charter', Times, serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;"><strong>Establish a water supply every time.</strong>&nbsp;&nbsp;If you're responding to a reported structural fire, PUT HOSE BETWEEN YOUR WATER SUPPLY &amp; YOUR RIG EVERYTIME. &nbsp;"Nothing showing" means nothing. &nbsp;That big 8-alarm fire we had in DC last march started out as "nothing showing". &nbsp;You &amp; me both have seen plenty of places BURN DOWN due to water supply issues. &nbsp;If you run out of water, GAME OVER. &nbsp;If you got dispatched to a reported fire and didn't take steps to establish a continuous water supply, sad to say, IT'S YOUR FAULT.</div><div style="font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', 'Bitstream Charter', Times, serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;"><br /></div><div style="font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', 'Bitstream Charter', Times, serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;"><strong>If it's an interior attack, it's an AGRESSIVE interior attack.</strong>&nbsp;&nbsp;There are two options in interior firefighting: winning &amp; losing. &nbsp;There is no such thing as "holding it". &nbsp;When you open the line, work the ceiling, work the walls, sweep the floor, and MOVE IN - repeat. &nbsp;If you're not moving, you're losing. &nbsp;&nbsp;</div><div style="font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', 'Bitstream Charter', Times, serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;"><br /></div><div style="font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', 'Bitstream Charter', Times, serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;"><strong>Back-up firefighters make or break the operation.</strong>&nbsp;&nbsp;The nozzleman is the glory-guy, but he's basically got the easiest job. &nbsp;If the back-up FF's don't feed the line and move it around obstacles, the nozzleman get's nowhere and the company fails as a whole.</div><div class="mceTemp mceIEcenter" style="font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', 'Bitstream Charter', Times, serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px; text-align: center;"><br /><dl class="wp-caption aligncenter" data-mce-style="width: 209px;" id="attachment_885" style="background-color: #f3f3f3; border-bottom-color: rgb(221, 221, 221); border-bottom-left-radius: 3px 3px; border-bottom-right-radius: 3px 3px; border-bottom-style: solid; border-bottom-width: 1px; border-left-color: rgb(221, 221, 221); border-left-style: solid; border-left-width: 1px; border-right-color: rgb(221, 221, 221); border-right-style: solid; border-right-width: 1px; border-top-color: rgb(221, 221, 221); border-top-left-radius: 3px 3px; border-top-right-radius: 3px 3px; border-top-style: solid; border-top-width: 1px; display: block; margin-bottom: 10px; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; margin-top: 10px; padding-top: 4px; text-align: center; width: 209px;"><dt class="wp-caption-dt"><img alt="The nozzle FF only has fun because the backup FF GETS HIM TO THE FIRE." class="size-medium wp-image-885" data-mce-src="http://traditionstraining.wordpress.com/files/2008/12/backup.jpg?w=199" height="300" src="http://traditionstraining.wordpress.com/files/2008/12/backup.jpg?w=199" style="border-bottom-style: none; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-color: initial; border-color: initial; border-left-style: none; border-left-width: 0px; border-right-style: none; border-right-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-top-style: none; border-top-width: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-top: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-top: 0px;" title="backup" width="199" /></dt><dd class="wp-caption-dd" style="font-size: 11px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-top: 0px; padding-bottom: 5px; padding-left: 4px; padding-right: 4px; padding-top: 0px;">The nozzle FF only has fun because the backup FF GETS HIM TO THE FIRE.</dd></dl></div><div style="font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', 'Bitstream Charter', Times, serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;">These are just a VERY FEW of my first thoughts regarding a combat ready engine company. &nbsp;What are yours?</div><div style="font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', 'Bitstream Charter', Times, serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;">Happy Holidays,</div><div style="font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', 'Bitstream Charter', Times, serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;">-Nick</div><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/9049491352093978807-8527879544201493156?l=fe-nick-martin.blogspot.com' alt='' /></div>tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-9049491352093978807.post-85278795442014931562011-11-22T19:56:00.000Z2012-03-15T14:00:47.853ZUpcoming Class: Engine Company Operationsnoemail@noemail.orgNick<div style="background-attachment: initial; background-clip: initial; background-color: white; background-image: initial; background-origin: initial; background-position: initial initial; background-repeat: initial initial; font: normal normal normal 13px/19px Georgia, 'Times New Roman', 'Bitstream Charter', Times, serif; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-top: 0px; padding-bottom: 0.6em; padding-left: 0.6em; padding-right: 0.6em; padding-top: 0.6em;">Saturday June 25, 2011 - Saturday June 25, 2011<br /><br />1500 Twining Road, Dresher, PA<br /><img _mce_src="http://traditionstraining.com/wp-content/plugins/event-espresso.3.0.19.b.13//images/map.png" _mce_style="padding-right: 5px;" alt="View Map" border="0" src="http://traditionstraining.com/wp-content/plugins/event-espresso.3.0.19.b.13//images/map.png" style="border-bottom-width: 0px; border-color: initial; border-left-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-top-width: 0px; padding-right: 5px;" /><a _mce_href="http://maps.google.com/maps?q=1500 Twining Road,Dresher,PA,19025" href="http://maps.google.com/maps?q=1500%20Twining%20Road,Dresher,PA,19025" target="_blank">Map and Directions</a>&nbsp;|&nbsp;<a _mce_href="http://traditionstraining.com/?page_id=4383&amp;regevent_action=register&amp;event_id=5&amp;name_of_event=Engine+Company+Operations+%288-hour%2C+Ft.+Washington%2C+PA%29" class="event_espressoter_link" href="http://traditionstraining.com/?page_id=4383&amp;regevent_action=register&amp;event_id=5&amp;name_of_event=Engine+Company+Operations+%288-hour%2C+Ft.+Washington%2C+PA%29">Register</a><br /><br /><br /><strong><a _mce_href="http://traditionstraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/thumb_31155_1458221381965_1426305763_1180470_4193891_n.jpg" href="http://traditionstraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/thumb_31155_1458221381965_1426305763_1180470_4193891_n.jpg"><img _mce_src="http://traditionstraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/thumb_31155_1458221381965_1426305763_1180470_4193891_n-300x198.jpg" alt="" class="alignright size-medium wp-image-4589" height="198" src="http://traditionstraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/thumb_31155_1458221381965_1426305763_1180470_4193891_n-300x198.jpg" style="border-bottom-width: 0px; border-color: initial; border-left-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-top-width: 0px; float: right;" title="thumb_31155_1458221381965_1426305763_1180470_4193891_n" width="300" /></a></strong><strong><span _mce_style="color: #ff0000;" style="color: red;">This 100% hands-on class will focus on the cornerstone of effective engine company operations: getting attack hoselines in place for firefighting.</span></strong><span _mce_style="color: #000000;" style="color: black;">&nbsp;We will discuss a variety of issues including water supply issues, extended length handlines, and multi-story firefighting operations. Emphasis will be on using the student&rsquo;s present engine company to employ ingenious and &ldquo;street-smart&rdquo; solutions in stretching handlines. Students will expand their ability to operate as an efficient engine company member and acquire skills for a variety of situations. Just some of the things we will cover are:</span><br /><ul><li><strong><em>Standpipe Operations</em></strong>: Students will learn various methods to load and deploy both 1.75&rdquo; and 2.5&rdquo; standpipe racks. Scenarios will focus on fire attack in standpiped buildings and associated challenges.</li><li><strong><em>Tactical Nozzle:&nbsp;</em></strong>Students will experience differences between smooth-bore and fog nozzle operations. Emphasis will be placed on appropriate stream application fire attack as well as &ldquo;tactical positions&rdquo; that allow a firefighter to overcome heavy-fire conditions to get water on the seat.</li><li><strong><em>Overcoming Fireground Problems:&nbsp;</em></strong>Quick reaction to problems is essential. This station will show students how to overcome nozzle problems, burst lengths, wedged under door, lost water, hoseline obstacles, etc.</li><li><strong><em>Pushing In &ndash; 1.75&rdquo; Handlines:&nbsp;</em></strong>This station will focus on techniques to move a hoseline will constantly flowing water &ndash; as necessary when extinguishing multiple rooms or a floor of fire. In addition, this station challenges the hose team&rsquo;s teamwork and the skills of the back-up firefighters.</li></ul><ul><li><strong><em>Pushing In &ndash; 2.5&rdquo; Handlines:&nbsp;</em></strong>The largest handline returns as a usable interior attack line in this station. Students will learn tips &amp; techniques to make this line moveable and manageable for interior fire attack, even with a small hose team.</li><li><strong><em>Long-Length Attack Lines:&nbsp;</em></strong>Students will practice techniques for covering distances of 300-400 feet with minimal manpower in less than 90 seconds. Associated hose loads will also be demonstrated. Emphasis will be placed on stretching &ldquo;every inch&rdquo; and on the importance of the back-up firefighter.</li></ul><div _mce_style="text-align: center;" style="text-align: center;"><a _mce_href="http://traditionstraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/DSC05334.JPG.jpg" href="http://traditionstraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/DSC05334.JPG.jpg"><img _mce_src="http://traditionstraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/DSC05334.JPG-225x300.jpg" alt="" class="alignnone size-medium wp-image-4590" height="300" src="http://traditionstraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/DSC05334.JPG-225x300.jpg" style="border-bottom-width: 0px; border-color: initial; border-left-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-top-width: 0px;" title="DSC05334.JPG" width="225" /></a>&nbsp;<a _mce_href="http://traditionstraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/IMG_3465.jpg" href="http://traditionstraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/IMG_3465.jpg"><img _mce_src="http://traditionstraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/IMG_3465-224x300.jpg" alt="" class="alignnone size-medium wp-image-4591" height="300" src="http://traditionstraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/IMG_3465-224x300.jpg" style="border-bottom-width: 0px; border-color: initial; border-left-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-top-width: 0px;" title="IMG_3465" width="224" /></a></div><a _mce_href="http://traditionstraining.com/?page_id=4383&amp;regevent_action=register&amp;event_id=5&amp;name_of_event=Engine+Company+Operations+%288-hour%2C+Ft.+Washington%2C+PA%29" class="event_espressoter_link" href="http://traditionstraining.com/?page_id=4383&amp;regevent_action=register&amp;event_id=5&amp;name_of_event=Engine+Company+Operations+%288-hour%2C+Ft.+Washington%2C+PA%29">Register</a></div><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/9049491352093978807-4915642822664967500?l=fe-nick-martin.blogspot.com' alt='' /></div>tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-9049491352093978807.post-49156428226649675002011-05-09T13:21:00.000Z2012-03-15T14:00:48.914ZMultiple Options are Key in Forcible Entrynoemail@noemail.orgNick<div style="background-attachment: initial; background-clip: initial; background-color: white; background-image: initial; background-origin: initial; background-position: initial initial; background-repeat: initial initial; font: normal normal normal 13px/19px Georgia, 'Times New Roman', 'Bitstream Charter', Times, serif; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-top: 0px; padding-bottom: 0.6em; padding-left: 0.6em; padding-right: 0.6em; padding-top: 0.6em;">Like many firefighters, I have witnessed someone at the door to the fire building repeatedly trying the same technique over and over with no success. &nbsp;This is frustrating because, with the exception of some public service calls, we were not called to force the door but rather to handle the fire (or other emergency) on the other side of it. &nbsp;<strong>All firefighters, regardless of position or assignment must maintain good forcible entry skills, because we can't do our job until we get inside the door.</strong><br /><br /><strong></strong>Over the years, forcible entry has become a speficic interest of mine. &nbsp;I have had many great mentors on the topic and my own share of fireground screw ups, all of which taught me one very important fact about forcing doors of any kind: &nbsp;<span _mce_style="color: #0000ff;" style="color: blue;"><strong>YOU MUST HAVE MULTIPLE TECHNIQUES FOR WHEN PLAN "A" FAILS.</strong></span><br /><br /><span _mce_style="color: #0000ff;" style="color: blue;"><strong></strong></span>As an example, last month Danny Doyle and I were just outside Austin, TX working with the&nbsp;<a _mce_href="http://www.roundrocktexas.gov/home/index.asp?page=80" href="http://www.roundrocktexas.gov/home/index.asp?page=80" target="_blank">Round Rock Fire Department</a>&nbsp;on truck company operations for the week. &nbsp;Of course one of the skills was forcible entry. &nbsp;Using their department's door prop, each student forced the door numerous times. &nbsp;Now each student forced the same door prop, which used the same stock of material, and forced it using the same approach. &nbsp;Below is a picture of some of the metal "locks" that they forced. &nbsp;What do you notice? &nbsp;<strong>THEY ARE ALL DEFORMED DIFFERENTLY.</strong><br /><div class="mceTemp mceIEcenter" draggable="" style="text-align: center;"><br /><dl _mce_style="width: 310px;" class="wp-caption aligncenter" id="attachment_4576" style="background-color: #f3f3f3; border-bottom-color: rgb(221, 221, 221); border-bottom-left-radius: 3px 3px; border-bottom-right-radius: 3px 3px; border-bottom-style: solid; border-bottom-width: 1px; border-left-color: rgb(221, 221, 221); border-left-style: solid; border-left-width: 1px; border-right-color: rgb(221, 221, 221); border-right-style: solid; border-right-width: 1px; border-top-color: rgb(221, 221, 221); border-top-left-radius: 3px 3px; border-top-right-radius: 3px 3px; border-top-style: solid; border-top-width: 1px; display: block; margin-bottom: 10px; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; margin-top: 10px; padding-top: 4px; text-align: center; width: 310px;"><dt class="wp-caption-dt"><a _mce_href="http://traditionstraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/IMG_0335-5.jpg" href="http://traditionstraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/IMG_0335-5.jpg"><img _mce_src="http://traditionstraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/IMG_0335-5-300x224.jpg" alt="" class="size-medium wp-image-4576" height="224" src="http://traditionstraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/IMG_0335-5-300x224.jpg" style="border-bottom-style: none; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-color: initial; border-color: initial; border-left-style: none; border-left-width: 0px; border-right-style: none; border-right-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-top-style: none; border-top-width: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-top: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-top: 0px;" title="IMG_0335 5" width="300" /></a></dt><dd class="wp-caption-dd" style="font-size: 11px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-top: 0px; padding-bottom: 5px; padding-left: 4px; padding-right: 4px; padding-top: 0px;">Know how you know how the door will respond? AFTER YOU'RE DONE.</dd></dl></div><span _mce_style="color: #ff0000;" style="color: red;">It goes to show the point that 2 doors, made by the same company, installed by the same person on the same day, and locked in the same manner, will likely respond differently even when attacked with the same series of techniques</span>. &nbsp;This is just due to subtle variations in angle/placement of attack, force delivered, and probably the inherent slight variations in a piece of metal.<br /><br />The take home here is that you can't just have plan A, or just plan A &amp; B. &nbsp;You have to have C,D,E,F,G,H,I, et cetera. &nbsp;<strong>Because when YOU'RE the one between the fire and the rest of the box alarm, ALL EYES ARE ON YOU and everyone is WAITING FOR YOU - it's probably the most stressful spot on the fireground.</strong>&nbsp;It means we have to expect the unexpected - we have to be able to recognize when what we are doing is not working, and have another step to move onto.<br /><p><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><object width="320" height="266" class="BLOGGER-youtube-video" classid="clsid:D27CDB6E-AE6D-11cf-96B8-444553540000" codebase="http://download.macromedia.com/pub/shockwave/cabs/flash/swflash.cab#version=6,0,40,0" data-thumbnail-src="http://i.ytimg.com/vi/11PofrV12yc/0.jpg"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/11PofrV12yc?f=user_uploads&c=google-webdrive-0&app=youtube_gdata" /><param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /><embed width="320" height="266" src="http://www.youtube.com/v/11PofrV12yc?f=user_uploads&c=google-webdrive-0&app=youtube_gdata" type="application/x-shockwave-flash"></embed></object></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><p><br />In our classes we teach "troubleshooting forcible entry". &nbsp;This video is a brief demonstration of one of the students forcing a troublesome door and working through a variety of steps in order to get the door in a pretty quick timeframe. &nbsp;As a disclaimer, it it not an inclusive discussion of all the skill points and tips for an inward door. &nbsp;<span _mce_style="color: #0000ff;" style="color: blue;"><strong>I always say that there is a list of techniques and a list of tools, all possibilities to get us through the door. &nbsp;The kicker is that the list is CONSTANTLY RE-ORDERED at each fire based on asking yourself:</strong></span></div><ul><li><strong>What tools do I have available?</strong></li><li><strong>What manpower do I have available?</strong></li><li><strong>What I have I already tried?</strong></li></ul>The results of thinking those questions may take what was previously #22 on your list of preferences and move it to #1 for this fire, because for instance you are by yourself and only have a Halligan bar.<br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="color: red; font-size: 15px; font-weight: bold;"><br /></span><br /><div style="text-align: center;"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="color: red; font-size: 15px; font-weight: bold;">Remember forcible entry is NOT AT ALL about force, it's all about technique.</span></div><div style="text-align: center;"><br /></div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="color: red; font-size: 15px; font-weight: bold;"></span>If you'd like to break some doors, we have a combination Truck Company Ops and Forcible Entry Academy class coming up in Bensalem, PA in August. &nbsp;<a _mce_href="http://traditionstraining.com/registration/" href="http://traditionstraining.com/registration/" target="_blank">Click here for information and registration.</a>&nbsp;Or we'd be happy to come to you, just&nbsp;<a _mce_href="mailto:info@traditionstraining.com" href="mailto:info@traditionstraining.com" target="_blank">email us</a>.</div><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/9049491352093978807-1403732085255126394?l=fe-nick-martin.blogspot.com' alt='' /></div>tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-9049491352093978807.post-14037320852551263942011-05-04T15:37:00.000Z2012-03-15T14:00:50.068ZThe Basic Goals of RIT & Class in Bedford, VAnoemail@noemail.orgNick<a _mce_href="http://traditionstraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/IMG_0192-31.jpg" href="http://traditionstraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/IMG_0192-31.jpg" style="clear: right; cssfloat: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;"><img _mce_src="http://traditionstraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/IMG_0192-31-224x300.jpg" alt="" class="alignright size-medium wp-image-4466" height="300" src="http://traditionstraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/IMG_0192-31-224x300.jpg" title="IMG_0192 3" width="224" /></a>This weekend TT instructors Nick Martin (DCFD/KVFD), Scott Kraut (FFxFD), Chris Birch (DCFD), and Roger Steger (BCFD/KVFD) traveled south to Bedford County, Virginia. &nbsp;We were being brought in to do some RIT training with the 3 departments in the county that had primary responsibilities for RIT - Bedford FD, Forest FD, and Stewartsville FD.<br /><br />Class focused on two simple sets of rules.<br /><br /><div _mce_style="text-align: center;" style="text-align: center;"><span _mce_style="text-decoration: underline;" style="text-decoration: underline;"><span _mce_style="color: #0000ff;" style="color: blue;"><strong>The primary goal of the RIT should be to:</strong></span></span></div><ol><li><strong><span _mce_style="color: #ff0000;" style="color: red;">Locate the downed firefighter.</span></strong></li><li><strong><span _mce_style="color: #ff0000;" style="color: red;">Keep the downed firefighter on continuous air.</span></strong></li><li><strong><span _mce_style="color: #ff0000;" style="color: red;">Keep the fire off the downed firefighter.</span></strong></li></ol><span _mce_style="color: #ff0000;" style="color: red;"><span _mce_style="color: #000000;" style="color: black;">Most operational LODD's result from asphyxia first and burns second. &nbsp;<em><strong>The goal of the initial team is to create a protective envelope around the downed firefighter. &nbsp;If you keep the firefighter on air and the fire away, you can work on solving any additional challenges such as collapse, etc...</strong></em></span></span><br /><br /><span _mce_style="color: #ff0000;" style="color: red;"><span _mce_style="color: #000000;" style="color: black;">Our second rule was:</span></span><br /><div _mce_style="text-align: center;" style="text-align: center;"><span _mce_style="color: #0000ff;" style="color: blue;"><strong><span _mce_style="text-decoration: underline;" style="text-decoration: underline;">Most successful rescues of firefighters are a combination of:</span></strong></span></div><ol><li><span _mce_style="color: #ff0000;" style="color: red;"><strong>Excellent basic firefighting skills.</strong></span></li><li style="border-bottom: medium none; border-left: medium none; border-right: medium none; border-top: medium none;"><span _mce_style="color: #ff0000;" style="color: red;"><strong>Basic tools and equipment.</strong></span></li><li style="border-bottom: medium none; border-left: medium none; border-right: medium none; border-top: medium none;"><span _mce_style="color: #ff0000;" style="color: red;"><strong>Ingenious, out of the box thinking.</strong></span></li><li style="border-bottom: medium none; border-left: medium none; border-right: medium none; border-top: medium none;"><span _mce_style="color: #ff0000;" style="color: red;"><strong>Communication, problem-solving, and teamwork.</strong></span></li></ol><div class="separator" style="border-bottom: medium none; border-left: medium none; border-right: medium none; border-top: medium none; clear: both; text-align: center;"><object width="320" height="266" class="BLOGGER-youtube-video" classid="clsid:D27CDB6E-AE6D-11cf-96B8-444553540000" codebase="http://download.macromedia.com/pub/shockwave/cabs/flash/swflash.cab#version=6,0,40,0" data-thumbnail-src="http://1.gvt0.com/vi/3Z1B1CuJZOU/0.jpg"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/3Z1B1CuJZOU&fs=1&source=uds" /><param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /><embed width="320" height="266" src="http://www.youtube.com/v/3Z1B1CuJZOU&fs=1&source=uds" type="application/x-shockwave-flash"></embed></object></div><div style="border-bottom: medium none; border-left: medium none; border-right: medium none; border-top: medium none;"><br /></div><div style="border-bottom: medium none; border-left: medium none; border-right: medium none; border-top: medium none;">There is not a one-size fits-all tool you can buy and throw on the rig to solve your RIT problems. &nbsp;Scenarios are often unique and often highlight a situation we hadn't thought of until after it occurred. &nbsp;<em><strong>To be prepared we must first be excellent at fighting fire and PREVENTING the RIT deployment and second we must be problem-solvers with many "tools in our toolboxes" from which we can pull and generate a solution.</strong></em></div><div style="border-bottom: medium none; border-left: medium none; border-right: medium none; border-top: medium none;"><br /></div>Class on Saturday started with a 4-hour seminar on RIT essentials and team formation. &nbsp;In the afternoon we worked on practical skills focusing on:<br /><ul><li>locating the firefighter and use of search-rope kits</li><li>troubleshooting and resolving SCBA emergencies</li><li>packaging and moving the downed firefighter</li></ul>Sunday was entirely hands-on scenarios. &nbsp;We demonstrated the reality that <span _mce_style="color: #0000ff;" style="color: blue;">a 4 firefighter RIT is NOT likely to last long enough to complete an entire rescue.</span> Students overcame scenarios involving missing firefighters, a catastrophic floor collapse, burned through stairs with members trapped above, and firefighters through a hole into the basement, among others. &nbsp;The staff of TT was constantly impressed at the skill, ability, and attitudes of the members from Bedford County. &nbsp;All scenarios were successful and much was learned by both students and instructors.<br /><h2>What was the last RIT training you did? &nbsp;Was it realistic? &nbsp;Was it based on the rules above? &nbsp;<span _mce_style="color: #0000ff;" style="color: blue;"><strong><span _mce_style="color: #ff0000;" style="color: red;">Remember - no one is coming in for us, but US. &nbsp;Stay </span><span _mce_style="text-decoration: underline;" style="text-decoration: underline;">COMBAT READY</span>.</strong></span></h2><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a _mce_href="http://traditionstraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/299659_orig.pjpeg.jpg" href="http://traditionstraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/299659_orig.pjpeg.jpg" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img _mce_src="http://traditionstraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/299659_orig.pjpeg-300x225.jpg" alt="" class="aligncenter size-medium wp-image-4474" height="225" src="http://traditionstraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/299659_orig.pjpeg-300x225.jpg" title="299659_orig.pjpeg" width="300" /></a></div><span _mce_style="color: #0000ff;" style="color: blue;"><strong><br /></strong></span><br /><img height="77" src="http://img2.blogblog.com/img/video_object.png" style="filter: alpha(opacity=30); left: 234px; mozopacity: 0.3; opacity: 0.3; position: absolute; top: 501px; visibility: hidden;" width="96" /><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/9049491352093978807-3216745052581122536?l=fe-nick-martin.blogspot.com' alt='' /></div>tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-9049491352093978807.post-32167450525811225362011-04-07T13:35:00.000Z2012-03-15T14:00:51.144ZCutting the Adams Right Locknoemail@noemail.orgNick<div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', 'Bitstream Charter', Times, serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;"></span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', 'Bitstream Charter', Times, serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;"><div style="margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-top: 0px;">We've done a bunch of talking about the Adams-Rite lock and forcing entry to storefronts, partly because it's a forcible entry challenged found almost anywhere and everywhere. <span _mce_style="color: #0000ff;" style="color: blue;"><strong>Like all things firefighting, the key to success is having not just "Plan A" - but multiple plans. Depending on your scenario, one may be preferable than another at one fire and less preferable at the next. &nbsp;</strong></span>Once option for forcing entry at these fires is of course to cut the throw of the lock. Check out this quick video tip:</div><div><br /></div></span></div><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="295" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/tHwIVuKUnKc?fs=1" width="480"></iframe><br /><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', 'Bitstream Charter', Times, serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;"></span><br /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', 'Bitstream Charter', Times, serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;"><ul><li><span _mce_style="color: #ff0000;" style="color: red;"><strong>What is your "go to" technique for these doors? Why?</strong></span></li><li><span _mce_style="color: #ff0000;" style="color: red;"><strong>What circumstances would cause you to move this cutting technique to the top of the list?</strong></span></li></ul><div style="margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-top: 0px;">Let us know your thoughts, and <a _mce_href="http://traditionstraining.com/tag/adams-rite/" href="http://traditionstraining.com/tag/adams-rite/" target="_blank">check out these other related articles on the topic</a>.</div></span></div><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/9049491352093978807-1795638282804140959?l=fe-nick-martin.blogspot.com' alt='' /></div>tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-9049491352093978807.post-17956382828041409592011-03-19T13:50:00.000Z2012-03-15T14:00:52.174ZRegistration Open for Officer Development School - Edgerton, WInoemail@noemail.orgNick<div style="background-attachment: initial; background-clip: initial; background-color: white; background-image: initial; background-origin: initial; background-position: initial initial; background-repeat: initial initial; font: normal normal normal 13px/19px Georgia, 'Times New Roman', 'Bitstream Charter', Times, serif; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-top: 0px; padding-bottom: 0.6em; padding-left: 0.6em; padding-right: 0.6em; padding-top: 0.6em;"><div><div><div class="mceTemp" draggable=""><br /><dl _mce_style="width: 250px;" class="wp-caption alignright" id="" style="background-color: #f3f3f3; border-bottom-color: rgb(221, 221, 221); border-bottom-left-radius: 3px 3px; border-bottom-right-radius: 3px 3px; border-bottom-style: solid; border-bottom-width: 1px; border-left-color: rgb(221, 221, 221); border-left-style: solid; border-left-width: 1px; border-right-color: rgb(221, 221, 221); border-right-style: solid; border-right-width: 1px; border-top-color: rgb(221, 221, 221); border-top-left-radius: 3px 3px; border-top-right-radius: 3px 3px; border-top-style: solid; border-top-width: 1px; float: right; margin-bottom: 10px; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px; margin-top: 10px; padding-top: 4px; text-align: center; width: 250px;"><dt class="wp-caption-dt"><a _mce_href="http://traditionstraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/EdgertonODS.pdf" href="http://traditionstraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/EdgertonODS.pdf"><br /><img _mce_src="http://traditionstraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/gr-300x231.jpg" alt="" height="185" src="http://traditionstraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/gr-300x231.jpg" style="border-bottom-style: none; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-color: initial; border-color: initial; border-left-style: none; border-left-width: 0px; border-right-style: none; border-right-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-top-style: none; border-top-width: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-top: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-top: 0px;" width="240" /></a></dt><dd class="wp-caption-dd" style="font-size: 11px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-top: 0px; padding-bottom: 5px; padding-left: 4px; padding-right: 4px; padding-top: 0px;">Click here to download course flyer</dd></dl></div>Traditions Training is excited to announce that registration is now open for our "Officer Development School",&nbsp;<strong>to be held November 5 &amp; 6 at the Edgerton Fire District in Edgerton, Wisconsin</strong>.&nbsp;Learn real-world leadership and street-smart tactics featuring experienced officers from the&nbsp;Kentland VFD, FDNY, and Fairfax County&nbsp;Fire Department.<br /><br /><span _mce_style="color: #0000ff;" style="color: blue;"><em><strong>Featuring hands-on participation with various leadership challenges and tactical scenarios, this program will have you interacting with leaders of other departments and challenging your decision-making as you examine and improve your personal leadership style.</strong></em></span><br /><span _mce_style="color: #0000ff;" style="color: blue;"><em><strong><br /></strong></em></span><br />To insure individual attention and participation, enrollment is limited. &nbsp;<a _mce_href="http://traditionstraining.com/registration/" href="http://traditionstraining.com/registration/" target="_blank">Register today by clicking here</a>.<br /><br />**Please note that due to fixed costs, registration is non-refundable after 10/13/10.</div></div><div><br /></div></div><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/9049491352093978807-7168042303518968256?l=fe-nick-martin.blogspot.com' alt='' /></div>tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-9049491352093978807.post-71680423035189682562011-03-18T13:51:00.000Z2012-03-15T14:00:53.843ZHUD Window Thinking and Learning from Past Firesnoemail@noemail.orgNick<div style="background-attachment: initial; background-clip: initial; background-color: white; background-image: initial; background-origin: initial; background-position: initial initial; background-repeat: initial initial; font: normal normal normal 13px/19px Georgia, 'Times New Roman', 'Bitstream Charter', Times, serif; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-top: 0px; padding-bottom: 0.6em; padding-left: 0.6em; padding-right: 0.6em; padding-top: 0.6em;">The term HUD Window refers to the stereotypical wooden board up frequently seen on "vacant" buildings, damaged buildings, and occasionally buildings under construction. It's not a standardized term - I'm sure there are many regional variations. Just as there are variations in the name, there are variations in the style, construction, and manner of installation.&nbsp;<span _mce_style="color: #ff0000;" style="color: red;"><strong><em>As with all things forcible entry, a "one plan" approach is likely to fail you when the unexpected is encountered.</em></strong></span><br /><a _mce_href="http://traditionstraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/IMG_0026-6.jpg" href="http://traditionstraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/IMG_0026-6.jpg"><img _mce_src="http://traditionstraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/IMG_0026-6-300x224.jpg" alt="" class="size-medium wp-image-4239 alignright" height="224" src="http://traditionstraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/IMG_0026-6-300x224.jpg" style="border-bottom-width: 0px; border-color: initial; border-left-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-top-width: 0px; float: right;" title="IMG_0026 6" width="300" /></a><br />While out doing some district familiarization and rookie training we stopped at this house, which was the site of a recent fire.&nbsp;<strong><span _mce_style="color: #0000ff;" style="color: blue;">How often do you go by the address of fire you ran last tour, or the fire that the other shift went to?</span></strong><br /><br />Unfortunately, I've worked in places where nobody has any interest in visiting the fire we ran last tour, or that the other shifts ran on the days off. &nbsp;That's a terrible waste of resources. &nbsp;Not only is there a fire with good things to discuss, but it's a fire that ACTUALLY HAPPENED IN YOUR AREA! &nbsp;Take a minute during the day to top by and see what went down. &nbsp;In our area it would not be uncommon do go back to an address a second time due to arson or careless squatters. &nbsp;In this case we were able to not only to learn what to expect, and how houses in this area are being secured, but also do some rookie training and talk as a group about different ideas.<br /><br /><span _mce_style="color: #ff0000;" style="color: red;"><strong>Different ideas are exactly what you'll need for these situations</strong></span>. When I posted a brief pic of this house on our Facebook page the other day we had no less than 5 ideas in a few minutes. Is this something you spend time talking with your crew about, or do you just watch SportCenter all day?<br /><br /><strong><span _mce_style="text-decoration: underline;" style="text-decoration: underline;">There are many ways to skin this cat, but here are a few of my initial thoughts:</span></strong><br /><a _mce_href="http://traditionstraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/IMG_0022-2.jpg" href="http://traditionstraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/IMG_0022-2.jpg"><img _mce_src="http://traditionstraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/IMG_0022-2-224x300.jpg" alt="" class="alignright size-medium wp-image-4244" height="210" src="http://traditionstraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/IMG_0022-2-224x300.jpg" style="border-bottom-width: 0px; border-color: initial; border-left-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-top-width: 0px; float: right;" title="IMG_0022 2" width="157" /></a><br /><ul><li><span _mce_style="color: #ffa500;" style="color: orange;"><span _mce_style="color: #0000ff;" style="color: blue;">As you pull up at a fire, don't blindly run up with the same tools. Look at what you have.</span>&nbsp;</span>For example, as the OV FF here I would be thinking about bringing a chainsaw due to multiple boarded up windows - that's not a usual tool for me in that position. &nbsp;I would make two cuts - one each as close to the outside of the frame as I could judge.</li><li>I'd also consider a short ladder (10' or less) to provide me with better access to these shoulder height windows (<a _mce_href="http://traditionstraining.com/2010/01/training-tips-through-the-eyes-of-the-outside-vent-man-helmet-cam-footage-with-voiceover-training-tips/" href="http://traditionstraining.com/2010/01/training-tips-through-the-eyes-of-the-outside-vent-man-helmet-cam-footage-with-voiceover-training-tips/" target="_blank">see this idea in use in Joe Brown's OV video here</a>). &nbsp;These 2x4 braces were also nailed into the sides of the frames, that may limit the effectiveness of certain removal techniques.</li><li>As the irons FF or officer, i might think to tell my OV to start right away on the windows as we head to the door. Given the lack of an outside 2x4 here,&nbsp;<span _mce_style="color: #0000ff;" style="color: blue;">I think we can make a relief strike just below the bolt heads with the 8lbs axe and just drive the bolts through to make access to the front door. &nbsp;<span _mce_style="color: #000000;" style="color: black;"><strong>Remember that YOU might have a plan and a thought, but the effectiveness of the entire CREW will improve if everyone knows it - COMMUNICATE. &nbsp;Ideally, PLAN AHEAD.</strong></span></span></li><li><span _mce_style="color: #ff0000;" style="color: red;">Be prepared for surprises</span>. &nbsp;You may assume by the presence of the HUD coverings over the door area that there is no additional challenge, however a peak inside allowed us to see that the original security gate was still in place. &nbsp;How strong is it? &nbsp;Who knows, but worth being prepared for.</li></ul><br /><div _mce_style="text-align: center;" style="text-align: center;"><a _mce_href="http://traditionstraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/IMG_0025-5.jpg" href="http://traditionstraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/IMG_0025-5.jpg"><img _mce_src="http://traditionstraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/IMG_0025-5-224x300.jpg" alt="" class="size-medium wp-image-4241 alignnone" height="300" src="http://traditionstraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/IMG_0025-5-224x300.jpg" style="border-bottom-width: 0px; border-color: initial; border-left-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-top-width: 0px;" title="IMG_0025 5" width="224" /></a>&nbsp;<a _mce_href="http://traditionstraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/IMG_0023-3.jpg" href="http://traditionstraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/IMG_0023-3.jpg"><img _mce_src="http://traditionstraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/IMG_0023-3-224x300.jpg" alt="" class="alignnone size-medium wp-image-4240" height="300" src="http://traditionstraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/IMG_0023-3-224x300.jpg" style="border-bottom-width: 0px; border-color: initial; border-left-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-top-width: 0px;" title="IMG_0023 3" width="224" /></a></div><div _mce_style="text-align: left;" style="text-align: left;"></div><ul><li>Of course being the site of a previous fire, I have to consider the buildings stability. In our area, squatters and vagrants are a distinct likelihood so my intentions are to enter if at all possible. &nbsp;That said,&nbsp;<span _mce_style="color: #ff0000;" style="color: red;"><strong>I'm paying extra attention to the floor's stability as I move ahead. &nbsp;I'm also thinking that overhaul from the previous fire has given the fire a head start into void spaces.</strong></span></li></ul><br /><strong>Additional Resources (thanks to our Facebook friends!):</strong><br /><ul><li><strong><a _mce_href="https://www.facebook.com/l.php?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.allenemergency.com%2Fhud_board_up_specs_for_city_boardups.html&amp;h=f09c0" href="https://www.facebook.com/l.php?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.allenemergency.com%2Fhud_board_up_specs_for_city_boardups.html&amp;h=f09c0">http://www.allenemergency.com/hud_board_up_specs_for_city_boardups.html</a></strong></li><li><a _mce_href="https://www.facebook.com/l.php?u=http%3A%2F%2Fcmdfd.blogspot.com%2F2010%2F09%2Fsome-board-ups.html&amp;h=f09c0" href="https://www.facebook.com/l.php?u=http%3A%2F%2Fcmdfd.blogspot.com%2F2010%2F09%2Fsome-board-ups.html&amp;h=f09c0">http://cmdfd.blogspot.com/2010/09/some-board-ups.html</a></li><li><a _mce_href="https://www.facebook.com/l.php?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.usfa.dhs.gov%2Fdownloads%2Fpdf%2Fpublications%2Fnapi4.pdf&amp;h=f09c0" href="https://www.facebook.com/l.php?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.usfa.dhs.gov%2Fdownloads%2Fpdf%2Fpublications%2Fnapi4.pdf&amp;h=f09c0">http://www.usfa.dhs.gov/downloads/pdf/publications/napi4.pdf</a></li></ul></div><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/9049491352093978807-8625888874049671846?l=fe-nick-martin.blogspot.com' alt='' /></div>tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-9049491352093978807.post-86258888740496718462011-03-17T13:53:00.000Z2012-03-15T14:00:54.982Z 500

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