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Sprinkler Systems

Wed, 20 Apr 2011|

Title 23 in the Essentials of Fire Fighting series. Presents the workings of sprinkler systems and components and discusses control and operating valves.

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Automatically Generated Transcript (may not be 100% accurate)

Welcome to this sample course from action training systems. All of the learning objectives included in the full course are listed on screen. You will be shown a sample of these sanctions in this demo a complete listing of our course content is available on our website. Automatic sprinkler systems. Significantly increase life safety and property conservation in your community. Sprinklers remain the most reliable form a fixed fire protection available today. In this program you'll see various types of automatic sprinkler systems and how the components of a sprinkler system operate. A variety of control in operating valves control the flow of water in the system and enable service and testing the system. The automatic sprinkler is the working end of the sprinkler system. The sprinkler was mounted on the system piping and includes a frame -- body. And orifice release mechanism that holds a cap over the orifice and the -- As water was released hits the deflected. Convert the standard water street and into -- wider spread the upright sprinkler sits on top of the -- It sends water to a deflected it breaks it up into a circle that is -- directed toward the floor. The sidewall sprinkler projects -- spray horizontally from along the face civil wall. It has a special deflected it creates a fan shaped pattern of water. For more information about the full line of over 200 course offerings available from action training systems. Visit our website at www. Action -- -- dot com. Or contact us at 180755. 1440. Extension three.

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