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Fire Escapes

Mon, 9 May 2011|

Mike Ciampo reviews procedures for firefighters operating on fire escapes.

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Automatically Generated Transcript (may not be 100% accurate)

[MUSIC] Hi, I'm Mike Ciampo. Welcome to this segment of training minutes. Today we're gonna go over some procedures on the fire escape. There's numerous type of ladders on a fire escape. We have the drop ladder, we also have the gooseneck ladder up at the top. When we go to release the drop ladder, many firefighters were taught to stand out front. The drop ladder is held by a hook or a counter weight. When we go up to lift this and release it, as we step back, many times the ladder might fall out of the tracks. It may be old, warped, dilapidated. It can fall out and injure us. Firefighters should try to maintain their position. Beneath the fire escape. They'll use their hook, they'll lift up, they'll release the hook, and then the ladders gonna come down. If the ladder falls out of it's tracks you're protected by the fire escape. The fire [UNKNOWN] take this hook, he's gonna lift up. He'll release the hook. Now you have a lot of weight here. You don't want to hold the hook and try to carry it the whole the down. She's gonna come down with some force and speed. So you're just gonna, you're gonna lift up, release it. And as it comes down, she'll come, start coming down. Just step back. For protection. There's numerous types of fire escapes, again this is a drop ladder. Some firefighters are taught that they should climb the drop ladder beneath the fire escape and then rotate around. That's a real problem, again it can force the ladder out of its track, you can hit your tank, your head up. On the bottom of the platform so you're better off climbing the drop ladder from out front. [NOISE] Also, prior to climbing it give it a little shake make sure it's in it's tracks before climbing and putting your bodies weight on. Again, these things are out whether, year around. There's not much maintenance [INAUDIBLE] and some paint. When you go to climb, don't be so fast to climb in the middle. Try to keep your boots towards the outside. [SOUND] What this does. It keeps some of the weight at the wells and distributes more. If we get in this bouncing motion and [INAUDIBLE] we could bend these rails, it could forcefully come out, and we're gonna bend them. Remember, when we get to the drop ladder with our hand tools, we can use the hook to hook onto the rungs to help our climb. Pull up. [SOUND] Go straight to the hook. [SOUND] We'll get our, our balance position with our halligan. I will begin to climb and slide up the rails. [SOUND] [NOISE] As we, begin to proceed up to the next level, we can take our hook. [SOUND]. You can just hook it up on the next rail. Reach up. Stick it in. Grab your hand tool, [SOUND] and proceed up to the next level. [SOUND] Remember, as you go to proceed up the stairwell, the fire escape the fire escapes have been exposed to the elements year round matinence is very poor usually they only paint these things we don't want to run up the center and bounce up these stairs. What we want to do, is we want to maintain our feet, to the outside of the stringers. Just like we're going into a house, that has fire damage to the stairwell. We want to distribute the weight, to the edge, that's where the support of the stairs will be. So, we'll take our feet, and we'll go to the outside, so we don't break one of the treads. As you're going up, maintain one hand on the railing, so that if a strave does break, you don't fall through the fire escape. Remember, once we're up here, we're gonna retrieve our hook that we didn't have to carry up and bring it back up. So can work with it. I'm Mike Chappo. Thanks for watching this segment of training minutes.

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