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Bleeding

Tue, 22 Apr 2014|

Action Training Systems video on bleeding.

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Automatically Generated Transcript (may not be 100% accurate)

[MUSIC] Welcome, and thanks for viewing this program excerpt from Action Training Systems. All the training objectives included in this program are listed on the screen. The following video is a short sample from the program. A complete listing of our training products is available on our website. [MUSIC] The most serious is usually arterial bleeding. In arterial bleeding blood spurts from the wound with each heartbeat. The blood is oxygenated and appears bright red. Arterial bleeding can be difficult to control, because high pressure in arteries can cause a large of volume blood to be lost in a short amount of time. As the patients blood pressure drops, spurting may decrease as a result of blood loss. Arterial bleeding is not seen as often as venous or capillary bleeding, because the arteries are located deep in the body. In venous bleeding, blood flows as a steady stream from a vein. The blood appears darker red than arterial blood because it lacks oxygen and there is no pulsing in the flow. Bleeding from a vein can be severe or minor depending on the size and location of the vein affected. In most cases venous bleeding is easier to control than arterial bleeding because of the lower [MUSIC] Thank you for viewing this program excerpt. For more information about the full line of over 200 course offerings and other training materials available from Action Training Systems, please visit our website at www .action-training.com or contact us at 1 800 7 5 5 1 4 40, extension three.