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Communicating Expectations

Fri, 6 Jun 2014|

How do you communication your expectations to probies or covering firefighters? P.J. Norwood on what's expected of officers.

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Automatically Generated Transcript (may not be 100% accurate)

Welcome to fire engineering and the job with today's video blog, I'm PJ Norwood. As leaders your crew must understand your expectations. If you're the senior guy you will also must make sure the probee, the junior guys, recovering fire fighter know and understand your expectations as well. When a Probier company fire fighter comes into your house, is the first thing you show them how to make coffee, or do you walk them around the rig, make sure they're familiar with how you work and what you expect them, and what their role is in a variety of incidents? How you communicate your expectations will directly affect the outcome. Examples. If you expect your members restricted to an ad for every commercial fire, as you should, but you don't tell them, there be a day when an inch or three quarter will be pulled for a commercial fire. Do you expect your crew to never take the glass behind an ending company or to always coordinate the ventilation as you should? When they don't coordinate, and the building light's off, trapping, burning, or hurting the engine company, it's your fault. Even if you aren't on the roof, or with that [UNKNOWN]. And when they take that window or cut that hole. If they fall under your command, and you haven't communicated the expectations to them, it's your fault. So, tell you let's hear it. . How do you communicate your expectations to your crew? What were the top three things you taught to the ____ coming into the firehouse on day one? And what were the top three things you explained to a covering fire fighter? Someone who may have five years experience, but he comes from a slower house? So let's hear it. Post your comments below, appreciate you listening, I'm TJ Norr with Far Engineering with today's video blog. Welcome to fire engineering and the job with today's video blog, I'm PJ Norwood. As leaders your crew must understand your expectations. If you're the senior guy you will also must make sure the probee, the junior guys, recovering fire fighter know and understand your expectations as well. When a Probier company fire fighter comes into your house, is the first thing you show them how to make coffee, or do you walk them around the rig, make sure they're familiar with how you work and what you expect them, and what their role is in a variety of incidents? How you communicate your expectations will directly affect the outcome. Examples. If you expect your members restricted to an ad for every commercial fire, as you should, but you don't tell them, there be a day when an inch or three quarter will be pulled for a commercial fire. Do you expect your crew to never take the glass behind an ending company or to always coordinate the ventilation as you should? When they don't coordinate, and the building light's off, trapping, burning, or hurting the engine company, it's your fault. Even if you aren't on the roof, or with that [UNKNOWN]. And when they take that window or cut that hole. If they fall under your command, and you haven't communicated the expectations to them, it's your fault. So, tell you let's hear it. . How do you communicate your expectations to your crew? What were the top three things you taught to the ____ coming into the firehouse on day one? And what were the top three things you explained to a covering fire fighter? Someone who may have five years experience, but he comes from a slower house? So let's hear it. Post your comments below, appreciate you listening, I'm TJ Norr with Far Engineering with today's video blog.