Fire Engineering UniversityFire Engineering University is changing the way fire service professionals approach education.Our goal is to provide you with relevant, topical educational content that is easily accessible.

Please note that the testing aspect of Fire Engineering University is no longer available. These courses are provided only for their educational value and use in training.

Please send any questions to peterp@pennwell.com.

 

* Understanding Fireground Command

Faculty: Richard Gasaway

Understanding Fireground Command

Understanding how you make decisions and how to develop and maintain your situation awareness are keys to your success as an incident commander.

Educational Objectives:

  1. List and discuss the steps of the Traditional Decision-Making Process and explain why this process is not feasible at emergency incidents.
  2. Understand and explain the Recognition-Primed Decision-Making Process and explain how incident commanders use this process.
  3. Identify and explain the three levels of situation awareness and give examples of the actions the incident commanders perform at each level.
  4. Explain the role of expertise in making decisions under stress and identify ways to accelerate a commander’s experience.

* Changing the Culture of Safety in the Fire Service

Faculty: Ron Siarnicki, Richard Gist

42

What if there were one simple thing you could do to make a major shift toward a safety culture in your fire department? There is, and it's something you already do almost instinctively. Ron Siarnicki and Richard Gist discuss the relationship between firefighters' attitudes and behaviors and how consistent and systematic After-Action Reviews can promote a culture of safety in the fire service.

Educational Objectives:

  1. Outline the components of “culture” as it applies to the fire service.
  2. Discuss the relationship between attitude and behavior
  3. Identify the main components of the Theory of Planned Behavior and apply them to creating cultural change.
  4. Conduct a basic “hot wash” following company-level operations.
  5. Explain the implications of consistent and systematic After-Action Review (AAR) for promoting a culture of safety.

* Courage to Be Safe/Everyone Goes Home: A Look Inside the Program

Faculty: Ron Kanterman

34

We need to instill the safety culture in the current and the future generation of firefighters. Here are some tools and tips for getting the safety message to hit home in your department.

Educational Objectives:

  1. Understand the meaning and intent of the 16 Firefighter Life Safety Initiatives (LSIs).
  2. Understand how to implement the 16 LSIs in their fire department.
  3. Discover how to evaluate what their department’s status is in relation to firefighter safety.
  4. Have the tools to implement change.

* Technology and ARFF: Saving Lives Through Innovation

Faculty: Jeff Giraud

40

A look at four essential elements of aircraft rescue and firefighting (ARFF): agents, applications, appliances, and apparatus.

Educational Objectives:

  1. Identify and know the current status of the four essential elements of ARFF—Agents, Applications, Appliances, and Apparatus.
  2. Understand the timeline of ARFF’s operations: where the general strategies and tactics came from and where they are headed.
  3. Know some basic concepts with which all ARFF firefighters should be familiar, including the melting point of aluminum, the toxicity of the environment, and the priorities of operation.
  4. Recognize how current and future technologies may enhance ARFF, including thermal imaging

* Truck Company Operations: Maximizing Firefighter Safety

Faculty: John Mittendorf

30

Fireground operations consist of two viewpoints--fire attack and logistical operations, which are interrelated from the perspective of safety and the timely mitigation of an incident. The importance of truck company operations (or logistical operations) cannot be overstated. Five basic rules of fireground safety and 10 commandments for truck operators are presented.

Educational Objectives:

  1. Define the five basic rules of fireground safety.
  2. Understand the importance of reading the environment and understanding the fireground clock.
  3. Recommend a method for prioritizing fireground considerations from a truck company perspective.
  4. Define the three major concerns when ensuring the viability of an escape route.

* Pressurized Fire Attack Precautions: THE “BIG THREEE”

Faculty: Kriss Garcia, Reinhard Kauffmann

Using fans to bring a fire under control is effective and safe when employed correctly in structures that lend themselves to such a tactic. Learn when, where, and how to deploy a positive-pressure attack.

Educational Objectives:

  1. Understand the difference between positive-pressure attack (PPA) and positive-pressure ventilation (PPV).
  2. Know the conditions in which fans should not be used.
  3. Know when the Diagnostic Barometer of Interior Conditions indicates that the fire situation is conducive to PPA.
  4. Know to what the three “E”s in the “Big Threee” refer.

*Rope-Assisted Search Procedures in Large-Area Structures

Faculty: Mike Mason

41

Searching a large area when there is an urgency to save lives is a huge undertaking. Presented are simple, but concrete, techniques that can help you turn a huge task into a successful and safe accomplishment.

Educational Objectives:

  1. Identify and understand the need for search in large-area structures while being able to recognize hazards when searching for distressed firefighters or civilians.
  2. Assemble and construct the proper search rope bag system as well as position members and identify their roles and responsibilities in a rope-assisted search.
  3. Identify and demonstrate the principles of anchor, point, and shoot as they pertain to object and human anchors while also identifying techniques in rope tethering.
  4. Identify and perform the techniques and maneuvers of proficient rope line management, including locating distressed firefighters or civilians, incorporating their health assessment, and removing them along the main search rope line when exiting a large-area structure.
  5. Recognize and discuss the importance of air management, accountability, command and control, and communications regarding firefighter Maydays and civilian rescues.

*Timber Cribbing Use

Faculty: Billy Leach

*Timber Cribbing Use

Cribbing is one of the most frequently used and essential tools during rescue operations and is considered to be among the strongest means of support. In this course, Billy Leach discusses stabilization, how cribbing is used to manage gravity, and some important considerations when using cribbing.

25 Pointers for Your Engine Company

Faculty: Jeff Shupe

25 Pointers for Your Engine Company

This is a baseline for engine company operations ranging from pre-alarm considerations to post incident analysis. The educational objectives are as follows: 1. Describe the limits of various hoseline sizes and the appropriate size for specific fires using the acronym “ADULTS”. 2. Describe proper nozzle operating techniques. 3. Gain an understanding of the importance of apparatus positioning in terms of hoseline stretching. 4. Gain an understanding of the importance of proper hoseline pressure and flow.

A Firefighter's Silent Killer: Suicide

Faculty: Paul J. Antonellis, Denise Thompson

In this course, students will discover why suicide in society often occurs and discuss why people do not like to talk about suicide. They will be asked to understand how to change fire service culture regarding firefighter suicide and how to develop a national suicide prevention program aimed at the fire service.

A Side-By-Side Comparison of New and Old Construction

Faculty: Scott Joerger

A Side-By-Side Comparison of New and Old Construction

Two houses that sit side-by-side and look alike from the outside are dramatically different under fire because of the differences on the interior. In many cities, legacy construction prevails in many neighborhoods. Newer buildings are constructed in these neighborhoods to look aesthetically similar to the vintage of buildings they reside around. This can confuse firefighters as conventional operations in these newer buildings can be hazardous. Knowing the differences between older and newly-constructed occupancies is crucial, and this course will describe the differences and how to operate on the fireground accordingly. 

Assessing Rural Water Supply: A Geospatial Approach

Faculty: Jeremy A. Keller

Rural fire departments must master the art of identifying and maximizing existing and potential water supplies in their jurisdictions.

Avoiding Tire-related Vehicle Crashes

Faculty: Chris Daly

Avoiding Tire-related Vehicle Crashes

In addition to driving speed and the driver's lack of training, hydroplaning and tire blowouts are two other factors that contribute to fatal accidents.

Basement Fire Strategy and Tactics

Faculty: John Lewis, Robert Moran

Basement Fire Strategy and Tactics

There are several characteristics associated with basement fires such as obvious smoke conditions with no visible fire. Although these conditions may indicate a basement fire, there are other considerations to take into account. Basement fires can challenge the most well-prepared and well-trained fire departments. This course will outline the operational and tactical considerations for fighting basement fires. 

Bath Salts and Synthetic Marijuana: An Emerging Threat

Faculty: Rom Duckworth

Bath Salts and Synthetic Marijuana: An Emerging Threat

In this course, students will learn about so-called "designer drugs." Learn what constitutes bath salts and synthetic marijuana and their effects on patients.

Big Storms, Big Emergencies

Faculty: Jerry Knapp

Big Storms, Big Emergencies

In this course, discuss the reason unusual conditions lead to unusual problems during big storms and iscover how to preplan with your local utility. Learn the hazards bystanders pose to first responders and how to identify critical and dangerous infrastructure in your area.

Download the answer key HERE.

Building Construction: Lightweight Steel Framing

Faculty: Gregory Havel

Building Construction: Lightweight Steel Framing

Being able to distinguish between wood frame and steel construction is crucial to any size-up. Here's how to recognize steel frame so you can adjust tactics accordingly.

Code Enforcement: Critical for a Successful Fire Prevention Program

Faculty: Ben Coffman

Code Enforcement: Critical for a Successful Fire Prevention Program

This course Identifies the role and need of code enforcement and discusses its negative side and administrative issues.

Developing a Fire Service Training Program

Faculty: Brad Pinsky

Developing a Fire Service Training Program

Determine if your fire department's training programs reach their potential and how to consult your Organizational Statement when developing a training program. Also, learn how to prepare lesson plans and the legal requirements for firefighter training.

Emergency Response to Hybrid Bus Incidents

Faculty: Thomas Crist

Emergency Response to Hybrid Bus Incidents

Are you familiar with the types of buses operated in your jurisdiction? Although some of the same principles of operating around hybrid cars apply to hybrid buses, remember that everything is heavier and bigger in the bus. This course will describe the system design, emergency procedures, extrication and firefighting concerns with hybrid buses.

EMS Aspects of Extrication

Faculty: Rom Duckworth

EMS Aspects of Extrication

In this course, discover the successes of collaboration between rescue and emergency medical personnel, learn a comprehensive approach to extrication and how the “MARCH” acronym can be used in determining medical priorities, a review after-action items to prepare you for the next call.

Download the answer key HERE.

Evaluating the Human Factor on the Fireground

Faculty: Thomas Dunne

Evaluating the Human Factor on the Fireground

This course from Tom Dunne deals with the nonphysical aspect of firefighting and deals with what human behavior is the first response in a fire. Review several fires that resulted in a large loss of life due to specific human behaviors and get recommendations to manage the human factor on the fireground.

Every Pump Operator's Basic Equation

Faculty: Paul Spurgeon

Every Pump Operator's Basic Equation

The equation EP = NP + FL + APP + ELEV is the basic equation every pump operator needs to calculate when operating the fire pump. In this course, learn how to develop a proper fire stream, define friction loss and explain two ways water flows through hoses, and discover how elevation must be calculated into fire stream calculations.

Fighting Fires in Disposable Structures

Faculty: Gary Bowker

Fighting Fires in Disposable Structures

In this course, discover why lightweight wood-frame structures burn faster and fail sooner and learn the four current residential structural features that pose major risks during fires.

Fire Service Management: A Renewed Perspective

Faculty: Tim Hyden

Fire Service Management: A Renewed Perspective

It's becoming more evident that the fire service needs to conduct its business more efficiently. In this course, students will determine how a management team must be assembled, describe the four common components of management, and learn methods of leading through interaction and intrinsic and extrinsic management.

Fire Tactics for Attached Garages

Faculty: Bill Gustin

Fire Tactics for Attached Garages

Attached garages are filled with fire loads that can cause an incipient fire to rapidly intensify and take possession of the entire house. Learn what specific fire loads are typically encountered; the proper size-up considerations for fires in attached garages; Hoseline placement considerations; and methods to force overhead garage doors.

Fire Without Water: Today's Truck Company

Faculty: Jerry Smith

Fire Without Water: Today's Truck Company

In this course, learn the primary duties of a first-arriving truck company at a residential dwelling fire without an engine on scene and what decisions the truck officer will have to make to maximize effectiveness of his firefighters.

Firefighter Casualties: When “Old-School Firefighting” Doesn't Work

Faculty: Anthony Avillo

Firefighter Casualties: When “Old-School Firefighting” Doesn't Work

A cavalier approach to structural firefighting shows a gross misunderstanding of risk management and usually leads to needless injuries and deaths on the fireground. Your job is to keep personnel from developing such an old-school attitude.

Firefighter Safety Depends on Gas Detector Accuracy

Faculty: Bruce Lake

Firefighter Safety Depends on Gas Detector Accuracy

Departments can reduce the chance of injuries from natural gas explosions by maximizing the accuracy of gas detection equipment and training personnel to correctly interpret gas readings.

Firefighter Safety: Fire Leaders' Perspectives

Faculty: Scott Rounds

Firefighter Safety: Fire Leaders' Perspectives

In this course, students will learn how the decisions of chiefs can affect firefighter safety in the fire department. They will be understand the historical problem of chiefs’ decisions and how they have not had an significant impact of firefighter safety, discover what research has shown when no penalties exist for violating safety standards, and learn how recognize and work on reinforcing positive safety habits.

Download the answer key HERE.

Flat-Roof Operations: From the Street to the Roof and Back

Faculty: Anthony Avillo

Flat-Roof Operations: From the Street to the Roof and Back

 There are few areas more important than the roof when you are trying to mitigate a structure fire. In this course, Chief Avillo describes why the roof is the most pivotal, strategic points of operations. In this course, basic roof activities, operational tips and awareness considerations will be discussed; as well as pre-fire activities, roof access and egress, operational  tactics, and termination of the roof operation. 

Halon Replacement: Water Mist Fire Extinguishing Systems
Faculty: Ronald Spadafora

Halon Replacement: Water Mist Fire Extinguishing Systems

Are you current in fire extinguishing technology? A look at one system that can replace Halon 1301 and Halon 1211.

Help Make Your Employees Successful

Faculty: Alan Stocker

Help Make Your Employees Successful

Tips and techniques for helping firefighters navigate the maze that is their career successfully from the rookie stage through retirement.

Hoseline Operations for Residential Fires

Faculty: Bill Gustin

Hoseline Operations for Residential Fires

Tactics for stretching, advancing, and operating hoselines are critical to firefighting. A review of size-up factors to consider before deploying a hoseline at a residential fire.

How Prepared Is Your Engine Company?

Faculty: Brett Snow

How Prepared Is Your Engine Company?

The information provided in this course/article comes from lessons learned and skills handed down by very experienced firefighters and officers of the Chicago Fire Department. At the end of this course you will better understand effective ways to stretch a hose line, the roles of each member of the hose team, the do’s and don’ts of hose line management, and how to properly operate the pipe (nozzle). Also, this course will encourage self evaluation of one’s skill level as well as the skill level of your engine company as a whole.

How to Avoid Training Scars

Faculty: Christopher Brennan

How to Avoid Training Scars

In this course, you'll learn to recognize the instructor’s objective when the student leaves a training drill or shift, learn how to recognize and reduce performance scars, discover the benefits of stress-inoculation training, and understand the impact of psychological scars.

How to Inspire and Motivate Firefighters

Faculty: Anthony Kastros

How to Inspire and Motivate Firefighters

In this course, discover why the fire service needs strong, effective leadership and determine certain behaviors that erode public trust in firefighters. Students will also learn that, next to communication, motivation is one of the greatest skills that a leader must understand.

If Pigs Could Fly: Swine Flu Lessons

Faculty: Mike McEvoy

If Pigs Could Fly: Swine Flu Lessons

First identified in California, Texas, and Mexico during April 2009, swine flu (H1N1) continues to stress government, health care, and public safety resources. H1N1 lessons have been many, and there are likely more to come.

Improving Cardiovascular Health and Fitness

Faculty: Shawn Perry

Improving Cardiovascular Health and Fitness

How do you determine if you are fit enough to perform your job and survive? The first step is to make your cardiovascular health your first priority.

Incident Tactics System: Identifying Tactics

Faculty: Bob Pressler

Incident Tactics System: Identifying Tactics

Fire departments that use the incident command system can use this system to help them select the tactics that will bring an incident under control.

Interior Size-Up from the Door

Faculty: Samuel Hittle

A moment taken at the door to the fire area can affect the outcome of interior operations.

Is Your Department Complying with the NFPA 1404 Air Management Policy?

Faculty: Steve Bernocco, Mike Gagliano, Phil Jose, Casey Phillips

Is Your Department Complying with the NFPA 1404 Air Management Policy?

To comply with the new standard, the authors say, follow the Rule of Air Management: Know how much air you have in your SCBA and manage that air so that you leave the hazardous environment before your low-air alarm activates.

Magnetic Resonance Imaging Safety for Firefighters

Faculty: Craig Jones

Magnetic Resonance Imaging Safety for Firefighters

Although only a few firefighters have been injured by MRI machines, a little knowledge and good preplans can prevent future injuries.

Managing Big Fires 101: Divide and Conquer

Faculty: Thomas Dunne

Managing Big Fires 101: Divide and Conquer

The author shares lessons he learned while commanding operations at a wind-driven fire that threatened numerous buildings.

Mastering Fireground Command: 10 Commandments of Command

Faculty: Anthony Kastros

This course is an accompanyment to Mastering Fireground Command: Calming the Chaos. This course builds upon the incident scene failures discussed in Calming the Chaos with regards to: improper risk assessment, lack of incident command and accountability, inadequate communications and lack of standard operating guidelines. Students will be introduced to a command formula and templates that can be applied to incidents such as duplexes, townhomes and apartments. By applying this formula to incident operations, incident commanders have sound incident command and accounatibility, communications, and have a process to develop standard operating guidelines.

Mentoring: Perspectives from the Rookie and Veteran

Faculty: Brian Ward, David Rhodes

Mentoring: Perspectives from the Rookie and Veteran

Mentoring is the chance to pass on knowledge and experience that can't be found in books or classrooms, but both parties must be committed to the process.

New Technologies Focus on First Responder “Capability Gaps” and Needs - Parts 1 & 2

Faculty: Mary Jane Dittmar

New Technologies Focus on First Responder “Capability Gaps” and Needs - Parts 1 & 2

Evolving technologies from DHS, USFA, NIST, and NIOSH aim at improving firefighter health and safety and operational efficiencies. Evolving technologies in the areas of communications and firefighter locator systems. The educational objectives are as follows: 1. Describe how recent technological advances in health/safety, communications, and firefighting equipment have been improved in terms of scope, accessibility, and affordability. 2. Identify improvements in protective clothing 3. Identify advances in firefighting techniques for things such as win-driven fires. 4. Describe how communications equipment is changing and how firefighter locator technology is improving.

Officer Development: Filling the New Officer's Toolbox

Faculty: Bob Carpenter

Officer Development: Filling the New Officer's Toolbox

How can a new officer with little time in the field fulfill his duties as a first-line trainer? Miami-Dade (FL) Fire-Rescue helped solve this problem by adding hands-on officer training to its officer development school curriculum, with good results.

Qualities of Effective Incident Commanders

Faculty: Daniel P. Sheridan

Qualities of Effective Incident Commanders

 This course describes and examines 16 qualities effective incident commanders should possess. These principles apply no only to managment of wildland and structural fires, but to every aspect of good fire service management. Students will learn to apply these 16 qualities by using the L.E.C.E. and L.O.D.A.N.C.E acronymns to prevent fireground and firehouse mistakes.

Quality Hoseline Management for a Better Forward Advance

Faculty: Ray McCormack

Quality Hoseline Management for a Better Forward Advance

In this course from Ray McCormack of Urban Firefighter, students will determine options for hoseline placement, describe a problem encountered when using the first hoseline for both exterior and interior attack, commonly referred to as “Transitional Attack,” and  understand principles of managing hoselines in commercial and high-rise residential fires.

Quick Drills for the Chief Officer

Faculty: Steve Prziborowski

Quick Drills for the Chief Officer

One of the most important responsibilities a chief officer has is ensuring their personnel are properly trained for any type of emergency they may be faced with. Because of reduced staffing and budgets, a chief officer cannot rely on the administrative training division staff to be able to provide all of the necessary training for their personnel. Thus, it is critical for a chief officer to find the time to provide quality training to their company officers and their personnel, while being creative and thorough in the process.This course provides chief officers with sound drill topics to measure and evaluate the effectiveness of their training.

Rapid Fire Spread at Private Dwelling Fires

Faculty: Jerry Knapp

Rapid Fire Spread at Private Dwelling Fires

Learn why firefighters take house fires for granted and discover the principles of residential fire envelopment. Students will review the construction principles of modular construction and learn the tactical actions to employ in fast-moving house fires.

Download the answer key HERE.

 

Recognizing and Combating Firefighter Stress

Faculty: P.J. Norwood, James Rascati

Recognizing and Combating Firefighter Stress

In this course, students will learn why firefighter stress and post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been a taboo topic in the fire service and learn the warning signs of stress.

Responding to “Unknown” Emergencies

Faculty: Mark Waters

Routine emergencies often turn out to be complex. In this course, students will develop size-up skills to combat the hazards encountered with unknown emergencies.

Response to Homemade Explosives

Faculty: August Vernon

Response to Homemade Explosives

 First responders will be faced with myriad challenges when responding to IED/HME incidents. August Vernon discusses how to identify IEDs and HMEs and their principle hazards, as well as how to guard against intitial and secondary attacks. This course provides the first responder with the means to respond, identify, safeguard and mitigate IED/HME incidents.

Faculty: Mike Mason

RIT Communications, Activities, and Deployments at Structural Fires

In this course, students will review the NFPA Standard on Rapid Intervention Crews (RIC), discover recommendations for proactive RIC behaviors and philosophies, and determine variables to improve function and understanding of rapid intervention operations.

 

Faculty: Frank C. Montagna

Simulation Training: Decision-Making Aid

Computer simulations can help incident commanders to make life-and-death decisions rapidly on the fireground, regardless of real-world experience.

 

Faculty: Craig H. Shelley

16

Although the frequency of tank fires has decreased, tank size has increased. Fires in these larger tanks can be extremely hazardous as well as costly in terms of property and environmental damage and business interruption.

 

Faculty: James M. Dalton, Robert G. Backstrom, Steve Kerber

28

Recent Underwriters Laboratories tests demonstrate the behavioral differences between solid wood joist and lightweight wood structural members on fire and the collapse times of various floor and roof assemblies.

 

Faculty: Jeffrey L. Herbert

17

Although a serious respiratory hazard exists during overhaul, firefighters often give the hazard low priority.

 

Tactical Decision Making
Faculty: Steve Chikerotis

26

Examine case studies and lessons learned from the chief’s personal experiences in almost 30 years of crawling down hallways on the Chicago (IL) Fire Department. Each incident is brought to life through exciting pictures and video. Each story reinforces a powerful lesson learned, including risk management, reading smoke, building construction and collapse, fireground tactics, flashover, communications and accountability, commanding the Mayday, and RIT rescue. This course is geared to the seasoned veteran as well as the new recruit. The goal is to prevent firefighter deaths through safer and more effective fireground tactic

s.

 

Teamwork Key to Mitigating Trolley Collision
Faculty: Fred Sullivan

18

A light rail collision in Massachusetts tests the local mutual-aid response and proves how interagency drills between the Boston and Newton Fire Departments paid off.

 

The Company Officers Role in Safety and Survival
Faculty: Forest Reeder

23

This course will take a look at some of the most hazardous areas of fireground operations and identify what the company officer should be looking for to keep the crews safe.  Students will also be encouraged to rethink some typical tactical assignments when presented with hazardous fire and building conditions. You will be challenged to identify what the officer should be looking for and monitoring during operations. This program supports the 16 Firefighter Life Safety Initiatives by advocating better risk management and empowering the fire service membership to stop repeating history.

 

Faculty: Chris Daly

19

When departments purchase used vehicles designed for other purposes and convert them into firefighting vehicles, it could have disastrous results. A look at the risks and how to reduce them.

 

 
Faculty: Curtis Massey

85

Students will develop an understanding of where the air is going at high-rise fires, learn how high-rise construction-type effects on the Neutral Pressure Plane,  review Thermal Stack Effect, and discover ways to control the Stack Effect.

Download the answer keye HERE.

 

 

Faculty: Christopher Brennan

56

Teaching personnel to maintain their situational awareness will give them a better chance of avoiding disorientation at a fire, a risk factor that can lead to firefighter fatalities. Realistic, challenging, scenario-based training is key. This course will discuss the link between situational awareness and disorientation.

 

Faculty: Larry Collins

20

How will California, its people, and its structures withstand a 300-mile long, 30-foot rupture of the San Andreas Fault? This massive earthquake drill intends to find out.

 

Faculty: Jesse Quinalty

In this course, learn a discovered method to change how firefighters can be prepared for the worst, discover how most of a firefighter’s job duties are learned, review the Cone of Experience to estimate learning retention and experience, and review the Six Ts and the components of each.

Download the answer key HERE.

 

Faculty: Bill Gustin

Follow these fundamental rules to enhance safety and effectiveness during our next forcible entry operation. Experienced firefighters know when to use conventional methods to force doors and when more difficult doors call for power tools or through-the-lock methods. Here is a look at conventional techniques-using hand tools to pry and strike.

 

Faculty: Michael Terpak, Frank Viscuso

35

In this course, learn how to announce a strategic change to a defensive fire, determine when to request additional alarms, and learn how to deal with the potential of structural collapse.

 

 

Faculty: Erich Roden

In this course, students will review historical significance of self-ventilated fire, understand importance of locating and defining fire, describe impact of further ventilation of fire area, and learn methods of locating fire without increasing ventilation openings.

 

Faculty: Irvin Lichtenstein

In this course, the student will discover why wilderness search is a low-probability/high-risk response for emergency responders. They will define wilderness search, learn the search resources available across the country, and understand the cost and funding issues associated wilderness search.

Download the answer key HERE.

 

 

Wood-Frame Construction, Principles, and Hazards
Faculty: Paul T. Dansbach

35

The focus is on safe fire operations in all wood-frame structures. Methods of construction and potential for fire spread and collapse of the four types of wood-frame construction are discussed. Case studies are used to demonstrate collapse potential. Also, a look at occupancy types where wood-frame construction is commonly found and ways to identify the type of wood-frame construction in existing structures.

 

Faculty: Dennis Rubin

35

In this course, learn what to do first when you finally achieve the Fire Chief position, how to prioritize the steps needed to leave your mark, develop a transition plan, and discover the components of meeting compliance and completeness.

Download the answer key HERE.

 

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