Leadership

PRACTICAL HYDRAULICS FOR FIREMEN

Issue 9 and Volume 62.

PRACTICAL HYDRAULICS FOR FIREMEN Examples of Friction Loss—Continued. Example 3. The tank above the standpipe in a building is empty. What pressure will be required at the engine to give a pressure of 50 pounds at the nozzle on a 100-foot line of 2 1/2-inch hose leading from the standpipe 200 feet above the street? The standpipe is 6 inches in diameter, and is fed by two 200-foot lines of 3-inch hose direct from the engine. The nozzle is 1 1/4 inches in diameter. Solution: See Figure 32. First find the length of 2 1/2-inch hose equivalent to the given layout. The friction factor for two lines of 3-inch hose of equal length is 9.35; for the 6-inch standpipe it is 52. The siamesed lines of 3-inch hose=200/9.32=21.5 feet of 2 1/2inch hose. The 200 feet of 5-inch standpipe=200/52=4 feet of 2 1/2-inch hose. The total equivalent of the layout…

Subscribe to unlock this content

Subscribe Now