Leadership

After Rapid Growth, EMS Looks To Future With Less Federal Money

Issue 12 and Volume 134.

After Rapid Growth, EMS Looks To Future With Less Federal Money “Emergency medical service has become the mainstream of the American fire service,” says Jim Page, a former battalion fire chief and now executive director of the Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation. Page was speaking at the Born of Necessity EMS management seminar conducted in Cincinnati Oct. 21 through 23. Consider that the EMS movement is little more than 10 years old. Advances in medical science around 1970 were offering greater hope for victims of various emergencies. But it became obvious that a weak link existed—the need for prompt and effective prehospital care. Fire departments were in the best position to help, and in more and more communities they have met the challenge. Only six mobile intensive care units were in operation 10 years ago, according to Page. Now there are 3000. “I’m not aware of any other public service,”…

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