Leadership

SOME NOTES ON FOAM APPLICATIONS ON HAZARDOUS MATERIALS

Issue 7 and Volume 144.

SOME NOTES ON FOAM APPLICATIONS ON HAZARDOUS MATERIALS The choice to use foam at the Cooper County phosphorus incident—alcohol-resistant concentrates in particular—was indeed an excellent one. The agent, especially at 6% concentration and applied through air-aspirated equipment, produces a good-quality foam with good stability allows firefighters to operate at a safe range during initial attack and control, and allows a meager water supply to be maximized. White (or yellow) phosphorus is not particularly aggressive toward this foam; however, the flame and resident heat in the molten phosphorus takes its toll. As the molten mass is cooled to below 84 to 86°F, the frequency of foam applications diminishes and a sixto eight-inch blanket survives much longer. Foams used in hazardous-material mitigation/control generally evoke some reaction control (e.g., gradient dilution) or mechanical mechanism (e.g., membrane formation) that gives the foam a chance to contain the substance until remedial steps can be taken.…

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