Firefighting, Health & Safety

Exposure Tracker and Firefighter Behavioral Health Alliance Partner

Exposure Tracker, a health and safety program for firefighters, has finalized a partnership with the 501c non-profit, Firefighter Behavioral Health Alliance. Through this partnership they will be able to focus on firefighter mental health, improving an industry stricken with PTSD.

Having partnered with the San Francisco Firefighters Cancer Prevention Foundation, the International Firefighter Cancer Foundation and now the Firefighter Behavioral Health Alliance, the Exposure Tracker is aligning itself to cover all aspects of firefighter health and safety.

Exposure Tracker was created to put a firefighters health and safety in their hands and in their control. The inherent risks of being a firefighter are too often accepted as “just part of the job.” However, with awareness and best practices firefighters can address chronic illnesses.

The Exposure Tracker is the first of it’s kind to encompass all aspects of firefighter health and safety. Designed to assist firefighters with the ability to track toxic exposures, injuries and report communicable disease exposures. The program is also designed to assist agencies with tracking employee vaccinations, certification tracking, department wide analytics to assist in injury risk management, and real-time rehab tracking for on-scene health management.

Psychological exposures are one of the most overlooked health effects of being a firefighter. The fire-service culture is a macho one, and our society looks at mental health with a negative stigma attached to it. Mental health is the same as any other illness; when you get an illness or injury you go to the appropriate caretaker. Firefighters are normal people that are put in abnormal situations. The situations can have a significant effect on the psyche, and if it isnt addressed properly, it will continue to fester and lead to health issues such as depression, stress related heart disease, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), anxiety, substance abuse, and even suicide.