TEST OF A BABCOCK CHEMICAL ENGINE.

TEST OF A BABCOCK CHEMICAL ENGINE.

A correspondent sends us the following from Norfolk, Va.:

A. H. Spear, of Hayward and Company, New York, delivered the new double 60-gallon Babcock chemical engine on the 19th instant, when Chief Ryan subjected it to a severe test. The wind was blowing at the rate of fifty-five miles an hour, when the Ghislelin house, which is 40 by 18 feet and two stories high, was set on fire. On the lower floor were three windows and two doors, all open, and two window holes on the top floor, besides the open fireplaces and chimney, and other openings made by order of the chief. The building was lathed and plastered and a wagon-load of shavings and kerosene was used to start the fire. When the shingles of the roof began to faff in, Chief Ryan directed Captain Kcgebein and the chemical crew to “ go for it.” Mr. Spear operated the engine, and bo’h lines of hose were used. After a hard fight, in which the chief lost a part of one ear, and Captain Kegcbein had his hand badly injured by the falling plaster and chimney, the fire was put out. The spectators, who had gathered to make fun of the “ soda fountain,” are now solid in support of the “ Dandy Babcock.” Mr. Spear took the check in payment for the engine to New York with him. The engine is now in commission, with Captain Kcgebein and four men in charge, and is located in Plume street.

Originally ran in Issue 9, Volume 19.

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