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THE EVOLUTION OF THE FIRE SERVICE EMS VEHICLE

Emergency medical services (EMS) vehicles have evolved as EMS providers` needs and capabilities have changed. Before the 1960s, the victim in a medical emergency did not receive much more medical assistance besides being transported to the hospital. Since ambulances often were staffed only by a driver, ambulance services until that time offered little in the way of lifesaving care. As EMS in the fire service has grown, EMS vehicles have become dual-role, much like the emergency personnel who sta

EMS COMMUNICATIONS EQUIPMENT

Firecom: Customized onboard headset and intercom systems available for emergency medical providers. Allows EMT to attend critically ill patient while receiving and transmitting vital medical information via headset. (800) 527-0555.

KNOX-VAULT EMS DRUG LOCKER

Knox Company: Provides secure storage of controlled substances. Solid steel construction with 58-inch-thick door. Accessed by UL-Listed, high-security Medeco lock and key. Options include one- or two-lock configurations and surface or recessed mounting. (800) 552-5669.

REPONDING TO VIOLENT SOCIETY: HARD LESSONS FROM TOLEDO

Whether or not we can attribute it to superstition, Friday the 13th (February 13, 1998) was a bad day for the City of Toledo and the Department of Fire and Rescue Operations (TFRD). When events of that day were over, three civilians were dead; two more were seriously injured; and two firefighters were wounded, one critically.

DHHS advisory opinion “has potential to disrupt emergency services”

Advisory Opinion 97-6, issued in October 1997 by the Office of the Inspector General (OIG) of the United States Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), has the potential to seriously affect the efficiency and finances of emergency medical services throughout the country, according to major fire service organizations.

Preparing for the”fireground” of life

I am writing in reference to Michael F. Staley`s "Kindness in a Cruel World" (One- Minute Motivator, December 1997). Thank you for publishing such quality information. Not only do you publish on a regular basis articles to help us perform better on the fireground, but you also present articles like this one that help us perform better on the "fireground" of life!

The Jefferson County Emergency Medical Services Disaster Response Team of Louisville,

The Jefferson County Emergency Medical Services Disaster Response Team of Louisville, Kentucky?Captain KEVIN JOHNSON, DIANE BAGBY, KEITH VINCENT, JOE MARSHALL, and RHONDA LAYMAN?received the National Fire Protection Association?s 1998 Warren E. Isman Scholarship. The team received the scholarship for demonstrating the most significant accomplishments and effective leadership among competing teams. The team will receive $2,000 in cash to cover expenses to attend the International Hazardous Materi

St. Louis (MO) initiates 9-1-1 Plus medical response referral system

Emergency medical calls to the St. Louis (MO) Fire Department are now processed through the new 9-1-1 Plus emergency medical response referral system initiated in March. Under the new arrangement, calls for situations that do not require prehospital treatment will be transferred to a referral dispatcher, who will connect the caller with an alternative transportation source or response agency.

Prince William County (VA) Phoenix Club a community force

The Prince William County (VA) Phoenix Club, which inducted its first members in February 1994, is an exclusive organization for survivors of out-of-hospital sudden deaths who were revived by the intervention of bystanders or the County`s emergency medical services system. Members are inducted every February. A total of 21 members have been inducted since the Club`s inception; the 20 surviving members are leading productive lives.

THE MENTALLY ILL EMPLOYEE AND THE FIRE SERVICE

Captain Smith had never been a good employee but has now finally crossed the line. His quick temper and radical mood swings make him one of the most difficult supervisors to work with on the shift, and he has been disciplined numerous times for inappropriate behavior (e.g., swearing at subordinates, abusing sick leave, and even threatening the battalion chief). Despite numerous attempts to help Smith through counseling, referral to the employee assistance plan (EAP), time off, and even a day off