FIRE ENGINEERING

FIRE ENGINEERING

JULY 1993 • VOL. 146 NO. 7

39 FIRES IN ROW FRAMES Row frame construction contains numerous features that impact firefighting tactics. Here’s a review of construction characteristics and an analysis of a fire involving row frames that reinforces lessons in rapid fire development, collapse potential, primary search, handline placement, roof ventilation, use of tower ladders, and operating in exposures.

Craig H. Shelley

47 FIRE SERVICE EMS: THE CHALLENGE AND THE PROMISE, PART 1 -AN OVERVIEW While there are numerous opinions about the place of EMS in fire departments, this much is certain: Many fire departments will continue to be or become a major provider of EMS, and once the decision is made to provide such service, you’d better do it right. Here’s the first installment of a three-part series that examines issues, arguments, challenges, strategies, and experiences born of the fire-I-MS marriage.

Mary Jane Dittmar

57 “BREAD AND BUTTER” OPERATIONS: STORE FIRES, PART 1 -CONSTRUCTION Our series on strategy and tactics for the most common types of structure fires (your “bread and butter”) continues with an identification of store types and their construction characteristics. Use this as a point of departure to update your preplans and refine your SOPs.

Bob Dressier

62 EMS POINTS TO PONDER The chief of EMS for the Shreveport (LA) Fire Department conducts an informal training session with photos of actual emergency medical incidents. Are you prepared for the multitude of responses you may face? We invite your participation.

Ricky Davitlson

67 COLLAPSE SEARCH AND RESCUE OPERATIONS: TACTICS AND PROCEDURES, PART 3: BOX CRIBBING Collapse void operations require your proficiency in constructing shoring and cribbing that’s safe and functional. Box cribbing is the most basic shore—and also the strongest, most stable, and quickest to erect. But as with any shore, your understanding of the materials, their capacities, construction methods, and safety precautions is essential —anything less could spell disaster.

John P. O’Connell

72 CHANGE THE CODE Brannigan identifies four deficiencies in our building codes that pose a severe hazard for firefighters and civilians in a fire situation and reinforces the importance of developing potential disaster scenarios to stress the point to appropriatecode authorities. Says the author, “The Russians waited for experience, and the outcome was Chernobyl.”

Francis L. Brannigan

6 EDITOR’S OPINION

10 VOLUNTEERS CORNER

14 TRAINING NOTEBOOK

22 FIRE SERVICE EMS

26 NEWS IN BRIEF

32 LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

75 FIRE COMMENTARY

77 FIRE SERVICE COURT

78 HAZARDOUS MATERIALS

85 APPARATUS DELIVERIES

86 EQUIPMENT DIGEST

89 MANUFACTURERS’ LITERATURE

90 COMING EVENTS

92 NAMES IN THE NEWS

92 COMPANY NEWS

93 CLASSIFIEDS

96 RANDOM THOUGHTS

Store fires, p. 57

EMS points, p. 62

Box cribbing, p. 67

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