In Case You Missed It: July 2014 Fire Engineering Features

Check out some of the featured articles on firefighting and the fire service that ran this month on Fire Engineering.

     

I Found a Gun on My Patient. Now What?

The action should you take if you discover your patient has a gun on their person truly depends on several factors leading up to that moment, writes Jeremy Jones.

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Creative Thinking in Tech Rescue      

Creative Thinking in Technical Rescue

Mike Donahue reviews two outside-the-box methods for technical rescue applications, including sloped floor shoring and a quick way to lash a victim into a stokes basket.

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Ordinary People and Fire Extinguishers

William D. Hicks reports on a study done to refute the common fire service assertion that “civilians cannot safely use fire extinguishers.”

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Crude Oil By Rail Information and Hazards

Jeff Simpson discusses the response tactics firefighters should employ when responding to these hazardous materials incidents.

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The Dangers of Hoarder Fires

The dangers don’t stop when the fire goes out, writes Ryan Pennington.

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Create a Brand for Your Department

Although it’s important that we meet our service delivery benchmarks, we need to think outside of the box and find ways to reach out to the community so we are more visible, writes Jacob McAfee.

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Understanding “Nothing Showing”

Some very notable individuals and organizations have voiced opinions relating to the effectiveness and consequences of using this term, writes Thomas N. Warren.

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Implementing a Suicide Prevention Program

If you have considered including suicide prevention in your training regime but keep pushing it further down your list of priorities, think again, writes Mary VanHaute.

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Breaking Down Building Intelligence      

Breaking Down Building Intelligence

Jack Murphy and Sean DeCrane propose a real-time solution to enable fire suppression forces to stay ahead of the construction industry and ever-changing building systems.

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Drive the “Change Bus” or Get Run Over

Change is difficult; it is also one of the only areas of an organization that’s constant, writes David Griffin.

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Focus on the Basics to be the Best

Although stagnation remains at the root of failure, basic skills save the most lives (including ours) at fires, writes David DeStefano.

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MORE FEATURES

 

 

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