Urologists Urge Check Up During Prostate Cancer Awareness Month

The Large Urology Group Practice Association, representing more than 1,800 urologists nationwide, and Henry Schein Cares, the global corporate social responsibility program of Henry Schein, Inc., are partnering together to raise awareness among families across the country of the importance of putting prostate cancer check-ups on the calendar for the men in their lives. September —  for many families, back-to-school time for the kids – is also Prostate Cancer Awareness Month. To create more public awareness about the importance of early detection of prostate cancer to save men’s lives, LUGPA and Henry Schein have launched an educational initiative to put a prostate cancer check-up for Dad on the family’s back to school list.

“Prostate cancer can affect any of the men in our lives — our fathers, grandfathers, husbands, brothers, uncles, sons, friends and neighbors — but with early detection this disease is almost always curable,” said Dr. Deepak A. Kapoor, president of the Large Urology Group Practice Association and president of Advanced Urology Centers of New York. “As children return to school, this is a great time to remind men to have a discussion with their doctor to determine if they need a prostate check-up. Together we can help ensure that generations of men are there for not only their children’s back-to-school, but for their grandkids as well.”

According to Dr. Kapoor, one out of six American men will have prostate cancer in their lifetime; the incidence is even higher for African-American men and those with a family history of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer is the most common non-skin malignancy diagnosed in men; with early detection efforts, the death rate from prostate cancer has decreased by over 40% in the United States.

The largest study ever performed on screening for prostate cancer, the European Randomized Study for the Screening of Prostate Cancer (ERSPC), recently released its updated findings (N Engl J Med 2012; 366:981-990) demonstrating that for all patients there was a 21% survival advantage, and more importantly, for those with the longest follow-up (over 10 years), the advantage of screening increased to 38%. “Unfortunately, there are no symptoms during the early stages of prostate cancer, when the disease is most treatable,” added Dr. Kapoor. “Despite improvement in patient education and awareness, many men still fall through the cracks; prostate cancer remains the second leading cause of cancer death in American men. The tragedy is that when the disease is caught early, the 10-year survival is almost 99% … we all need to come together to ensure that our message is heard: early detection saves lives.”

Visit lugpa.org/b2s for more information.

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