A BANNER YEAR FOR NEWARK.

A BANNER YEAR FOR NEWARK.

(From our special correspondent.)

NEWARK, N. J., April 6, 1901.

The year 1901 has, thus far, been a banner one in the history of the Newark fire department. The losses have been the lowest in many years. In January,according to the report of Chief Kiersted, there were sixtynine alarms of fire of all kinds,of which fifty-two were first alarms, one a second alarm, and sixteen telephone alarms. The total loss was $12,000—an average per alarm of $173.91, and per inhabitant five cents, based on a population of 250,000. In February there were sixty-four alarms, forty-eight being box alarms, and sixteen telephone alarms. The. total loss was $25,000 —an average per alarm of $390.62, and per inhabitant of ten cents During March there were sixty-nine alarms, fifty-four being box alarms, and fifteen telephone alarms, and the total was only $5,000—an average per alarm of $72.46, and per inhabitant of two cents.—For the quarter ending March 31, 1901, there were 202 alarms of all kinds, of which 154 were first alarms from street boxes; one was a second alarm ; and forty-seven were telephone alarms. The total loss was $42,000—an average per alarm of $207.92, and a loss per head of population of seventeen cents_At the last meeting of the commissioners, Commissioner Burke offered a resolution that practically abolishes the still alarm, to the effect that, whenever notice of a fire is received at headquarters by telephone, the nearest box to the locality designated shall be sent out by the operator. In cases where the hose wagon attached to a company is needed no box alarm will be sounded.— The board ordered a large alarm gong, attached to the gong circuits to be placed at the corner of Broad, and Plane streets. A private fire alarm box will be placed in the factory of Tiffany & Co., located in the extreme northern part of Newark,on Highland avenue. —The four new houses under construction are progressing towards completion, and will be occupied when finished. One is a new house for No. 5 engine company; one for No. 15, and one for No. 16—both new companies. They will each be equipped with a threehorse steamer and two-horse hose wagon. The new house in the Clinton Hill district is for a chemical engine. This house is not satisfactory to the commissioners and may not be used for the present.

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