A DENIAL FROM BUFFALO.

A DENIAL FROM BUFFALO.

In reply to the criticisms of the National Board of Underwriters upon the peril threatening Buffalo, N. Y., from alleged poor water supply, Colonel Ward, commissioner of public works, states that “there will always be plenty of water for fire purpose’s, and fire insurance officials located 400 miles from Buffalo who order their local agents to cease taking fire risks here either betray their ignorance of the situation or are getting things in shape for a raise in rates. The numerous recent large conflagrations in various parts of the country have resulted in heavy losses to fire insurance companies. But the fire insurance companies have not suffered any loss in their Buffalo business, because the $1,250,000 in premiums paid into the companies here has more than covered all loss by tire in Buffalo. But the fire insurance companies have been trying for more than a year to raise the rates here, liven with several of the pumps crippled there would still be all the water that the fire department could use. So long as there is water in the mains the fire engines can get all they want, and even with the situation as bad as it could be reasonably imagined, we could still keep the mains full. I lie water system is divided into the high and low-service. The low-service extends over all that part of the city south of the reservoir. We pump into the reservoir and then the system becomes a gravity system. The high-service covers all that part of the city north of the reser voir and we pump the water direct into the mains for all that section of the city. If there should he a big fire downtown or anywhere in the lowservice district, we could concentrate the entire capacity of the pumping station into the low-service district if necessary. If there should be a big fire in the high-service district, wc could cut off the reservoir and pump every pump on the high-service. But that would not be necessary. With half our plant we could supply both sections with ample water for fire purposes. This talk about the Massasoit endangering the water supply has been all nonsene. Suppose the intake pier should be destroyed? We could still get all the water our pumps could lift. It must be remembered that the intake pier is nothing but the structure which is located at the ends of the two intake tunnels. No matter what happened to the pier, we should still have the tunnels, and could pump water through them, whether there was any pier there or not”

No posts to display