A Fair Mascot.

A Fair Mascot.

Marie Mahoney is the mascot of the California Veteran Firemen’s Association. She is the only girl mascot of the kind in the Uniced States. She was born in San Francisco twelve years ago, and is the plumpest, jolliest little girl that ever was, says the Examiner, just as if she wasn’t an officer in the “vets.” Marie is the daughter of State Senator Mahoney of San Francisco, and lives at the Baldwin. She is as natural and unaffected as a girl could be. The veterans idolize her, and were it not that she has two sturdy little feet to walk on and looks so well at the head of their ranks they would insiston carrying her on their shoulders all the time when they are tramping. But Marie walks, and she walks miles and miles every time they have a parade and never thinks anything of the mud and of getting tired. As the result she is the picture of health and doesn’t want to ever stop being a mascot.

Marie dresses just like the men, only she wears a black skirt. When she marches, she wears a red shirt made like the firemen’s to a “t,” even to the little hooks that keep the collar down, a black tie, and the most killing little helmet. And it is so near killing that she has to have a tiny fatigue cap fastened to her belt behind, just like the men. Her helmet is inscribed with all the monograms and letterings that make the other caps so interesting and mysterious. She carries besides, just like the three otherofficers, a silver trumpet and salutes with that, while the rest of the veterans salute with their hats.

When the San Francisco fire department took a trip east last year, Marie went with them. She saw the World’s Fair and all its wonders. When the veterans went to Washington, the president gave them a special reception and kissed the mascot, who gravely pinned a medal to his breast. He had been a great chum of Marie’s father in their old Buffalo school days.

A Fair Mascot.

A Fair Mascot.

Marie Mahoney is the mascot of the California Veteran Firemen’s Association. She is the only girl mascot of the kind in the United States. She was born in San Francisco twelve years ago, and is the plumpest, jolliest little girl that ever was, says the Examiner, just as if she wasn’t an officer in the “vets.” Marie is the daughter of State Senator Mahoney of San Francisco, and lives at the Baldwin. She is as natural and unaffected as a girl could be. The veterans idolize her, and were it not that she has two sturdy little feet to walk on and looks so well at the head of their ranks they would insist on carrying heron their shoulders all the time when they are tramping. But Marie walks, and she walks miles and miles every time they have a parade and never thinks anything of the mud and of getting tired. As the result she ts the picture of health and doesn’t want to ever stop being a mascot.

Marie dresses just like the men, only she wears a black skirt. W hen she marches, she wears a red shirt made like the firemen’s to a *’t,” even to the little hooks that keep the collar down, a black tie, and the most killing little helmet. And it is so near killing that she has to have a tiny fatigue cap fastened to her belt behind, just like the men. Her helmet is inscribed with all the monograms and letterings that make the other caps so interesting and mysterious. She carries besides, just like the three other officers, a silver trumpet and salutes with that, while the rest of the veterans salute with their hats.

When the San Francisco fire department took a trip east last year, Marie went with them. She saw the World’s Fair and all its wonders. When the veterans went to Washington, the president gave them a special reception and kissed the mascot, who gravely pinned a medal to his breast. lie had been a great chum of Marie’s father in their old Buffalo school days.