A FEW FACTS ABOUT THE WINSTON SYSTEM

A FEW FACTS ABOUT THE WINSTON SYSTEM

Winston, N. C., is built on the Piedmont range of mountains about 1,000 ft. above the level of the sea. When the last United States census was taken, its population was 10,008, the chief industries being tobacco, cotton and woolen factories. Its waterworks system was built in 1881-82 by the Winston Water company, under a ninety-nine-year franchise, at a cost of $52,000, The original source of supply was a well of 15 ft. diameter, a depth of 30 ft., with a brick wall 2 to 2 ½ ft. thick, the upper portion being laid in cement. From this well the water was pumped to a reservoir 79×78 ft. by 21½ ft. deep, 16×65 ft. above residence, 40 to too ft. above business section and 210 ft. above pump; capacity, 1,000,000 gals.; walls, brick laid in Portland cement, 11 ft. thick at base and battered from the outside from the surface of the ground to within 5 ft. of the top, and from that point to the coping perpendicular and 3 ft. thick. The pumping machinery had a daily capacity of 220,000 gals., Worthington waterpower, with boiler and engine for supplementary power. The pump-well was driven near a small stream, with a dam built across it, giving power to drive one overshot wheel. There was also a wrought iron force-main of 3,000 ft. of 6-in. pipe, rising 210 ft. The distribution mains were of cast iron. Today the source of supply is wells and a creek some two miles from the business centre. The capacity of the plant is 1,500,000 gals,; of the reservoir, 1,200,000 gals. There are three Worthington pumping engines, with a capacity of 1,300,000 gals. Of cast iron distribution mains, 12-in. to 4-in. diameter, four miles and upwards have been laid; hydrants set, over 150: meters (Union, Empire and Nash) installed, over 630—owned by the city; lead pipe services, over 700; domestic pressure, 20 lbs.; fire, 20 lbs. The daily consumption of water, which is of very good quality and filtered by the New York Continental Jewell process, is 412,000 gals, (average). The works, which now belong to the city, have cost over $120,000 to construct.

PUMPINT. STATION AND RESERVOIR, WINSTON, N. C.

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