A FEW WATERWORKS STATISTICS.

A FEW WATERWORKS STATISTICS.

Newark, N. J., has a system of reservoirs and pipelines which has cost the city $9,500,000. This, however, apparently covers its 304 miles of street mains. It seems to have been a pretty good investment, as the annual receipts are put down at $727,231, and the expenses at $115,000. The seven reservoirs have a capacity of 9,2000,000,000 gallons, with a daily capacity of over 38,000,000 gallons, of which we are using only 24,900,000 gallons, which runs out through 34,000 taps, of which 11,000 have meters. It’s surprising how far behind the times some other cities are. Twenty-three are still buying water from private companies, instead of owning their own plant. This list includes among others Denver, Easton, Pa., Kansas City, New Haven, Bridgeport, Paterson, San Francisco, and Charleston. There are twenty-two cities that have to depend upon artesian and driven wells for a supply. Most of the others get their water from lakes and rivers. Schenectady, N. Y., pumps water out of an “underground collecting gallery” into a reservoir. and Springfield, Ohio, has a “subterranean” supply. There are fourteen cities, besides New York, bigger than Newark, but only three cities in the country, and two of them small ones, sell as much water by meter. The others all keep to a greater extent to the old water rate plan. Milwaukee, Wis., measures more water to consumers than any other city, having 31,000 meters in use; Providence. R. I., has 18,544; Worcester. Mass., 12.820: Atlanta, Ga.. and Newark. 11,000 each; Boston, only 4.473: Buffalo, 1,200: Camden, N. J., 419: Chicago. 6.700: Denver. 305 Jersey City, 1,350: Paterson, N. J.. 2.700: Philadelphia, 1,435: and Trentort, N. J., 700. There are only ahout five cities that are not making good on their investment, so far as the sale of water is concerned, and most of them seem to be doing business at a good profit. Albany, N. Y., for instance, has a system that has cost $3,500,000. It gets its water from the Hudson river: spends $82,851 a vear for expenses, of which $30,660 is for coal; and takes in $290000. Baltimore’s svstem cost over $12000.000: its expenses are $809,830 a vear: its receipts, $957,758, Chicago has spent $33,500,000 on its water system and is now taking in $3,400,000 a year and paying out $1,253,826 for expenses. Philadelphia’s system has cost $37,000,000, its yearly expenses are $1,524,201, and its receipts, $3,331,437.

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