A Fire Department on Rails

A Fire Department on Rails

On the first page cover of this issue of FIRE AND WATER ENGINEERNG is shown a novel method of transporting a fire department and its apparatus. It is no less than fire engines mounted on small railroad trucks and traveling on rails. This unusual plan has been adopted in many of the camps of the American Expeditionary Forces abroad, the illustration showing an installation at the Supply Camp at St. Sulpice, Gironde, France. The conformation of the camps makes this arrangement particularly advantageous, and the speeders are built to run on the standard narrow gauge track that surround the cantonments, thus enabling the firemen to respond to an alarm in any portion of the camp with the highest speed and in record time. The majority of the men composing these camp fire departments are chosen for their knowledge of fire fighting and are members of the American fire departments on leave, serving with the forces on the other side. Of course, with the demobilization and the reduction of the army to a peace basis, many of these men have now returned and resumed their duties in their respective departments, or will soon do so. But, even so, there will be others to take their places in the smaller army that it will be necessary to maintain in the occupied territory after the peace treaty has been signed. Some of the men who have received their fireman’s training in the departments of this country will, no doubt, still remain to guard the camps from the common enemy of mankind. We are indebted to the U. S. A. Signal Corps for the interesting photograph on our cover.

A FIRE DEPARTMENT ON RAILS.

0

A FIRE DEPARTMENT ON RAILS.

The Pennsylvania Railroad company’s new fire department on rails was called out for the first time at Elizabeth. N. J., early on the morning of July 22 to extinguish a blaze on the railroad bridge over Prospect street. The company has suffered a great deal lately by bridge fires believed to have been caused by tramps and the idea of a traveling fire department of its own is a result. A locomotive has been equipped with fire pumps, while an additional tank car and tender contains about 150.000 gallons of water. There are six firemen who live in a caboose, and among the paraphernalia are hooks, ladders and helmets. One of these locomotives is stationed at the Waverly freight yards, and another is at the roundhouse at Rahway. The above trial was perfectly successful, and two more engines will be ordered at once to protect property in Jersey City, Newark and Trenton.