A FIRE-RESISTING BUILDING IN CINCINNATI.

A FIRE-RESISTING BUILDING IN CINCINNATI.

The Ingalls building recently erected at Cincinnati is a typical fire-resisting building. It is built of reinforced concrete and is practically a monolith. It occupies the entire area of a corner lot, fifty by 100 feet, and is fifteen stories and a full attic—practically sixteen stories—rising to a height of 210 feet above the sidewalks. The one-half of the basement is the usual twelve feet deep; but the other half, containing the power plant, is twenty feet deep. The foundations extend five feet below this, so that the entire heighht of the structure from the bottom of the foundation is 235 feet, entirely concrete-steel. In fact, it is a concrete box of eight-inch walls, with concrete floors and roof, concrete beams, concrete columns, concrete stairs. The whole is entirely devoid of the usual I-beams, Z-bars, angle irons, plates, rivets and bolts. It consists merely of bars imbedded in concrete. with the ends interlaced, making actually a complete concrete monolith of the entire building. The concrete is made of high grade Portland cement, clean sand, with grains of variable size, and crushed stone. It is mixed with enough water to make it semi-fluid, to insure intimate contact with and adhesion to the steel bars, and is well tamped. The floors are continuous slabs five inches thick, reinforced with a mesh of three-quarter-inch twisted steel bars laid eighteen to twenty inches between centres in both directions, and strengthened by a beam across the centre of the column bay, dividing this into two panels of sixteen feet square, without other supporting beams. Wind bracing has been carefully and sufficiently looked after. Despite all predictions to the contrary, the building was completed without difficulty or delay, it did not develop shrinkage cracks, and in the heaviest winds to which it has been subjected it has not shown-a perceptible tremor. Its complete fireproofness depends on its internal fittings, and the nature of its contents. The Baltimore fire emphasised with great clearness the value of steel reinforced concrete as a fire-resisting material.

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