A FIREPROOF RESIDENCE.

A FIREPROOF RESIDENCE.

The New York building code (says a New York building journal), is very strict upon the subject of concrete blocks and apparently treats them with the greatest suspicion, believing that, where there is such a chance to make poor blocks or blocks without a sufficient quantity of cement, it is wiser to condemn them all at the start than to permit them to be used in such a manner as to jeopardise the lives of the inhabitants of the buildings. Three sizes of blocks were used in a New Drop house—-12-in. for the basement walls, 8-in. for the walls above the basement, and 6-in. for interior partitions. The floors are supported by ,tx io-in. concrete beams, reinforced with bars, and over these is laid a concrete floor in one continuous slab, having imbedded in it nailing strips for the finished floor. Where partitions occur in the second story other than over firststorv partitions, they are carried by reinforced concrete girders, which show below the ceilings of the first story. The faces of these partitions, as well as the walls and ceilings, are in the main plastered with pulp plaster, which lias a soft and pleasing effect and can be tinted or adapted to various applied decorations. Some of the walls are covered with burlap, tacked to half-inch strips, put in after the walls and partitions were completed. The house stands by itself on a large corner lot, the two principal sides being flanked bv a terrace, the wall of wdiich is built of blocks with rock faces. The front entrance is covered w ith a porch built entirely of concrete, the braces and roof being reinforced with plain round rods. On one side of the house is a veranda, the columns of which are built up of large blocks and earna balustrade of interlaced blocks On the same side of the house is a pergola, the columns of which are built up square, with girders of reinforced concrete, carrying rafters of small poles left with the bark on. T he roof is of a somewhat novel construction, the fireproofing system being also carried out here. The rafters are reinforced with bars, over which ilaid a slab of concrete, reinforced with plain round rods placed both vertically and horizontally on the roof surface. The slab forming the roof extends down to form a cornice, thus completing the frame without a single piece of wood. The gutters are formed in the roof imbedding a wire mesh bent to the proper angle and the concrete troweled round and through this. The services of the tinner were rcouired only for the running of the roof leaders. The steps of the rear entrance are cast in one piece in place, a few rods being sufficient reinforcement for the purpose. The interior stairs are also of concrete, and there are two cement fireplaces in the dining room. ‘I he house is as nearly fireproof as is possible.

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