A GHOST IN THE SEWER.

A GHOST IN THE SEWER.

At East Orange, N. J., they have been engaged for a year or more putting in a system of sewerage. As part of the work, a tunnel from thirty to thirty-five feet below the surface, is excavated for the distance of half to three-quarteis of a mile. It is a very difficult operation, owing to the character of the soil, which is constantly caving in, and the tunnel has to be bricked up inside for its entire length. Italians are employed mostly upon the works, and in one of the shafts that has been sunk they have recently discovered a ghost. Tradition relates that a number of years ago an old well existed near where this shaft has been sunk, and that on one occasion a man fill down the well and broke his neck. The Italians now affirm that whenever one of them goes down the shaft alone he sees the ghost of this brokennecked individual promenading around in the tunnel without any head. He appears and disappears, and behaves in an altogether undignified manner for a respectable ghost. So great has become the terror regarding this apparition that no Italian can be persuaded to go down into this shaft alone, and even the foreman of the gang, who is an “ Italian from Tipperary,” declines to descend unaccompanied. During the hours of night his ghostly majesty holds supreme sway in the tunnel and this particular shaft, but when the Italians go down in couples he disappears and becomes invisible. What he has done with his head is a matter of conjecture, but while he was alive he was never known to go about promiscuously minus that necessary appendage. This mystery has excited considerable comment in East Orange.

OPPOSITION TO QUAKER Dam.—Several New York tax-payers have petitioned Governor Hill to recommend the repeal of the law of 1S86, reorganizing the aqueduct commission. The reasons given are that the commission is held to be committed to the project of constructing the Quaker dam at an early date, and this the tax-payers’ association is opposed to, from motives of expediency and economy. It is also urged that the commissioners are at fault in that they have not submitted the plans and specifications for the proposed dam to the public. It is argued that the project is an experiment on a colossal scale, and certainly should not be entered upon without a full exposition of the details and cost involved in the construction of the dam. The opponents of the scheme urge that the commissioners should as speedily as possible complete the construction of the Sodom and Muscoot dams, included in the plans for an increased water supply, and defer the Quaker dam project until a lime when the building of the structure is more imperatively demanded than it is now. The Sodom and Muscoot dams, it is claimed, would increase the storage capacity of the metropolitan water supply system fully 15,000,000,000 gallons.

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