A London Fire Escape.

A London Fire Escape.

One great feature in the present fire escapes is the canvas shoot fixed to the back of the main ladder; it is a loose trough of stout sail cloth fastened along behind the whole length of the ladder, open at each end, and large enough to allow any person to slide down easily when put in at the top; the inclination of the ladder when placed against a house prevents the descent being so rapid as to be dangerous. This canvas shoot is protected against the danger of catching fire by an outer covering of wire netting. Notwithstanding this, we have known it partially burnt, bM its I utility is not thus quite destroyed. The use of the shoot is obvious. Wncn, as sometimes happens, a crowd of half-dressed women and children, sometimes perfectly helpless from the effects of smoke and fright, crowd round the fire escape conductor as he enters the window, what is he to do? The fire raging below will not wait, and the delay of a few minutes in carrying them all down in succession might imperil his own life and the lives of those he has come to save. Not a moment need be lost ; the mouth of the canvas-shoot is just at the window sill, women and children can be safely placed in it, and the assistant or the police will help them out at the bottom as fast as the escape conducts them to the ground.—London Paper.

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