A MOTT HARBOR BLAZE.

A MOTT HARBOR BLAZE.

On Sunday evening last a fire which destroyed the freight and passenger station of the suburban branch of the N. Y. N. H. & H. RR., at East One hundred and Thirty-second street and Willis avenue in the borough of the Bronx, suddenly started while some thirty clerks were at work The flames spread so rapidly that these employes escaped with difficulty— one being seriously injured internally by falling down stairs. During the excitement in getting the freight cars and engines out of the way of the flames, a switchman had both legs cut off by a locomotive. He was removed to the Harlem hospital. Lewis Krakou, a fireman of engine company No. 71, was injured by falling timbers, and was also taken to the hospital. Three alarms were sent in, but, owing to the lack of water, several of the engines had to be sent back. After some delay the fireboat Havermeyer was sent for (why this was not done before no one knows) but it was some time before she reached the scene. As soon as she got to work the fire was got under control. Valuable records of freight business, which were stored in the building, were destroyed, and their loss will be a serious inconvenience to the company. Fortunately, duplicates of these records are on file in the offices of the company in Jersey City, N. J., and Hartford, Conn. The building was thoroughly gutted, and what is left must be pulled down and rebuilt. It was a three-story, slate-roofed brick structure, 300 by forty feet, in dimensions. George W. Brady, assistant division superintendent of the railroad estimated the loss at $250,000, which is too high. The cause of the fire is unknown.

The downtown track of the Manhattan railway runs within forty feet of the building, and as the cars rolled by the heat from the fire was so great that it peeled the paint off the car sides. Once as a train passed a gust of wind struck the column of fire, tipped it over, and the fiery tongues licked the elevated cars, making the passengers recoil in terror. The train was running at a good rate of speed, however, and the tire did no damage.

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