A New Fireproof Building

A New Fireproof Building

The beautiful new building of the American Geographical Society just completed on One Hundred and Fifty-sixth street, near Broadway, Manhattan, New York, is the nearest possible approach to an absolutely fireproof structure. It is four-stories, with a basement, which will serve as a storing place for geographical books, maps, etc. The floors on which the book stacks stand are throughout of plate glass, and the stacks are of cast iron with silver finish, the shelves of corrugated steel. No wood enters into any part of the construction. The first, third and fifth stack floors are connected by metal doorways, with the office, editorial and map floors respectively, of the main building. The second, fourth and sixth stack floors are mezzanine floors or entresols, which have connection with the floors of the main building by the stairways that lead from the bottom to the top of the stack floors, although that rule is departed from in the rooms above the basement.. A large metal booklift. operated by electricity, connects the basement with each of the six stack floors, and also with the first, second and third floors of the main building. If the lift is to he moved to any one of these floors, a button is pressed and the lift stops at the floor designated, and not till it stops can the doors to the lift be opened. If the buttons on two or more floors are simultaneously pressed, the lift does not move. Terrazzo, mixed cement and small marble fragments, 3 inches thick, practically indestructible and almost noiseless, are the substances of which the floors are composed throughout the main building. The stairways are of Norwegian marble, and the floor of the main hall, second story, is bordered with the same material. All the window frames, shelving. etc., on the four floors of the main building, are of quartered oak.

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