A New Pump for Racine.

A New Pump for Racine.

Racine, Wis., is soon to have a new pumping engine made by the Edward P. Allis Company of Milwaukee, to cost $30,000. The water company was established in 1886, and now its subscribers number 3000. There are two Blake pumps of 2.250,000 gallons capacity each. During the six years of this company’s existence there has been five miles of extension added to the plant, and there is now almost forty miles of pipe. There are four boilers of 100 horse-power each. The total number of fire hydrants is 356, all in use and up to grade, and the plant was never in better shape than at present.

The new engine is of the Allis Company’s latest triple expansion type, and similar to the three last engines supplied to the Milwaukee water-works and five supplied to the city of Chicago. Others of the same type have been sold at Omaha, Neb.; St. Paul, Minn.; Winona, Minn.; Detroit, Mich.; St. Louis, Mo., and other cities.

The engine will have three steam cylinders, one high pressure, eighteen inches in diameter ; one intermediate cylinder, thirty inches in diameter ; one low pressure, forty-two inches in diameter, ar.d all having a stroke of thirty, inches. There will be single three-acting outside packed pumps, with plungers thirteen and five eighth inches in diameter by thirty inches stroke. The stroke of the plungers arranged in such a manner that the flow of water into the city mains will be practically uniform, entirely relieving the pipes of any shock or jar.

William H. Laing has been the superintendent and manaccepted a position in Washington. Mr. Laing is no doubt one of the best posted and reliable water-works men in the country. It is mainly through his efforts that the plant has reached its high standard.

Our Western Letter.

OFFICE OF FIRE AND WATER,

202-206 LA SALLE STREET,

CHICAGO, Dec. 28, 1893.

Ashland, Wis., with a population of 10,000, has not been paying in her taxes, and Mayor O’Keefe has given notice that unless they are forthcoming he will at once discharge the entire fire department, police force and, in fact, all city departments.

They had a fire in a candy store at Louisville, Ky,, the other day, and a newspaper scandal has grown out of the too free talking of Captain Pickord of the salvage corps. It seems that The Courier-Journal published a statement wherein the firemen were accused of stealing candy and looting the store ; so the board of public safety began an investigation of the affair, and the evidence strongly went to prove the firemen innocent of the charge, and the reporters swore that Captain Pickord had given them the items and had also endeavored to inject a little ginger into the report by adding to the story, “give them a shot, they need it; the way they acted was outrageous.” The Courier-Journal makes the grave statement, on the authority of a prominent city official, that Captain Pickord has long tried to throw reflections on the Louisville Department in the hope that he would become chief. Captain Pickord denies this report, and thus it goes. How strange it seems that sweets should strip up sours.

The water sprinkler system in Symthe’s great store cut a caper the other day by going off unasked and soaking everything within reach. Although much damage was done, they were soon put under controi. Perhaps the pipes were impatient at not being properly inspected and thus sought to rebuke some one. Who knows ?

The big 38-inch water main through which the Sixty-eighth street pumping engine supplies that section of Chicago south of Thirty ninth street broke the other night and left that section without proper water supply for quite a time. In the meanwhile a small house caught hre, and the fire department suffered the uneasiness of seeing it burn down, while they stood by without a drop of water available.

Chief Smith of Duluth was removed by the board of fire commissioners, the nominal excuse given being alleged defective management of the department on December 2 at a fire. First Assistant Edward Jackson has been promoted chief.

Chicago is enjoying a decided rest in the matter of fires, all of which is appreciated.

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