A New Water Meter

A New Water Meter

Charles L. Silsby, St. Mary’s, Ohio, has invented and patented an improvement in water meters, the number of which is 1,238,203, dated August 28, 1917. The object of the invention is to provide a water meter with which a minimum of resistance is offered and by which the inventor is enabled to reduce the size of the meter. In accomplishing this purpose a maximum of leverage is provided between the piston and the register whereby the loss due to friction in the stuffing box is overcome. The inventor claims the combination of a casing providing a water passage, a disk piston mounted on said casing, a stem projected from said piston, a tapered guide engaging the upper end of said stem and between which and the top of said casing the movement of said stem is confined, a bifurcated lever actuated by said stem, an upright shaft, a connection between said upright shaft and said lever whereby the shaft is operated from the lever, escapement devices comprising a forked member fixed to said shaft, a crown wheel actuated by said escapement, and a worm shaft actuated from said crown wheel and through which movement is imparted to the meter register.

A New Water Meter.

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A New Water Meter.

The water meter illustrated herewith is the invention of E. Schinzel of Naples, Italy, and is patented in Great Britain. Fig. 1 is a vertical and Fig. 2 a horizontal section of the device. The outer casing is divided into two compartments A B as shown, the upper, A, of which is enclosed by the thick glass plate C. Fitted into this casing is an inner casing of ebonite, divided into two compartments D D1 as shown, through the centre of which passes the axis E of the paddle wheel F, supported at its lower end by a step. The water enters the annular chamber G between the inner and outer chambers B and D1 by pipe II, and entering the chamber D1 through oblique holes, tends to turn the paddle wheel F. The water then passes out of D1 by other oblique holes K into a second annular chamber I and escapes by the pipe J. The motion thus imparted by the in and outflowing water to F is transmitted by means of a suitable pinion on its axis E to a suitable train of wheels L L, operating any suitable counting mechanism.