A Peculiar Well in Florida.

A Peculiar Well in Florida.

In their investigation of the wells and underground waters of Florida the geologists of the United States Geological Survey have noted many interesting things. Among these is a well at Welaka, on St. Johns river, from which two kinds of water are obtained. This well is 309 ft. deep. The length of the casing is no ft. The well was first drilled to 160 ft., and from this depth ordinary “sulphur” water was obtained. The drill was then carried to a depth of 309 ft., where it encountered a strong mineral water, having a disagreeable, salty taste. In order to use both kinds of water an inner tubing was run nearly to the bottom of the well. Both this and the outer casing were connected with pumps, so that ordinary water and mineral water can be pumped at the same time. A favorite joke played on visitors is to give them a drink of the weaker water in the first glass and to replace it with the brine in the second. Not more than half a dozen wells of this kind are known in the country; but there is no reason why similar wells cannot be obtained in regions where the waters in the upper strata differ from those lying deeper. In these investigations of the waters of Florida the National and State surveys are co-operating, and much valuable information has been gathered during the winter’s work.

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