A PROGRESSIVE OKLAHOMA CITY.

A PROGRESSIVE OKLAHOMA CITY.

Tulsa, Okla., bids fair to assume a quasi-metropolitan rank, in the southwest country, so rapidly is it increasing in population and resources. It is one of the nine cities in the new State of Oklahoma which has more than 10,000 inhabitants —its present population being over 12,000. It stands on high ground overlooking the valley of the Arkansas river. It is a well-organised city, with eight newspapers—three daily, two monthly magazines, three national banks, two State banks, three trust companies, and two churches, good public schools, a city hall, modern hotels and office buildings, twelve miles of new brick and cement sidewalks, a progressive and aggressive city administration, and a large body of public spirited business men. It is, besides, an important railway centre—five roads meeting there— and has electric lights, a vigilant police service, an unlimited water supply, a modern waterworks system and an efficient paid fire department, organised in December. 1905. It is under the command of R. C. Adler, chief engineer, and is made up as follows: Hose company of four full paid men, with 2.000 ft. of hose; Cooney hose wagon; chief’s buggy. The Gamewell fire alarm telegraph system is installed with nine boxes. The fire limits cover the business portion of the city, which prohibits the erection of frame buildings, etc. The buildings are mostly brick and stone two to six stories in height. Sixty fire plugs are set on 6-in., 8-in. and 10-in. mains. Tulsa ought to be a good insurance risk.

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