A Proposed Water System for Reno

A Proposed Water System for Reno

In connection with the appraisement of the water company’s plant at Reno, Nev., recently made for the City Council, B. F. Leete, a civil engineer, has submitted to the Mayor and Council a circular letter on the subject of water supply for the city. He asserts that the Truckee River water is unfit for domestic use and that water underlying the town plat of the city is the source that should supply the city. Relative to the Truckee River water Mr. Leete said: “It is fit for irrigation, for fertilizing agricultural lands, and for power purposes, and should be used for those purposes only.” He goes on to say: “It is a matter of common knowledge that underlying the town plat of the city of Reno there exists an inexhaustible reservoir of pure water. At the high school building it is struck at a depth of about 85 feet. About two miles south of the Virginia street bridge over the Truckee River, on the Virginia road, it is obtained at a like depth. At Eighth and Sutro streets, at a depth of about 20 feet, the surface is 50 to 60 feet lower than the surface at the high school building. That is the water and source of water, pure and inexhaustible, that should supply the city of Reno.” Mr. Leete further says in part: “I will undertake to sink a threecompartment shaft of six-foot compartments, timbered with Oregon pine, 100 feet deep. If I strike the water supply that settles it. From the bottom of that shaft I will run a tunnel four and one-half feet broad at bottom, four feet broad at top and six feet high, and timber the same, 2,000 feet long. Such a tunnel will have a capacity of 381,480 gallons, will yield 1,041.66 gallons per minute for six consecutive hours. That tunnel will fill in six hours, consequently will be an inexhaustible source of water supply.” The construction of a reservoir 250 feet above the altitude of the railway crossing at Virginia street would give the city north of the Truckee water for fire protection, says Mr. Leete. Such a reservoir as he suggests would, it is stated, cost something over $23,000. South of the river householders would continue to be served with water from springs that supply Hunter Creek. Mr. Leete’s table of cost places the total expense of such a plant as he proposes at $254,849.76. The cost of operation would be $25,740 a year, while the net income, estimated at the sale of 1,500,000 gallons of water a day at a cent and a half a gallon, would be $56,385 a year.

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