A TRINITY OF FIRES IN MANHATTAN

A TRINITY OF FIRES IN MANHATTAN

Within a few blocks of each other there were three fires on the West Side of Manhattan, New York, on Saturday last, one succeeding the other so rapidly that there was not apparatus enough to reach them all at once. The first was in the West End Lyceum, on Fifty-second street, a large firetrap, which caught fire, no one quite knows how. There was some delay in turning in an alarm, and when the first company arrived a second and a third were sent in in rapid succession, followed by a fourth as soon as Acting Chief Kruger came on the scene. There were several sets of people in the building; some were rehearsing for plays; others were making costumes; others doing other work. All got out in safety. The firemen suffered greatly from the blizzard weather, and were badly handicapped by bursting hose and the like. One set of forty men had a narrow escape from death, when a high tower and flagstaff collapsed and came down on them. They managed, however, to scramble from under. After a fierce fight of four hours the flames were controled, and no outside property suffered, but the building was totally gutted. While the fire was at its height, an alarm came from 211-13 Columbus avenue, where an apartment house was on fire. Engines and trucks were sent, though they could be badly spared. In starting two engines cut the hose and the streets were at once flooded. The whole became a sheet of ice, and the horses could not stand or haul the apparatus, one engine being the heaviest in the department. A big racing automobile of unknown ownership pushed them up the incline, but meanwhile the fire had extended from the cellar to the roof, and added $25,000 to the $250,000 loss at the Lyceum. A small fire on Eighty-fourth street called off an engine to work on it, and it was late on in the evening before the exhausted firemen had a chance to rest.

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