A WELL PROTECTED THEATRE.

A WELL PROTECTED THEATRE.

The new Lincoln Square theatre at West Sixtyfifth street, near Broadway, Manhattan, New York, is probably the best protected against fire of any in the United States. It is built entirely of brick, with steel girders, terra-cotta arches and hanging ceiling. All the structural iron work, including and under the ceiling over the hanging ceiling, and the under part of the galleries is protected by terra-cotta fire-blocks, and there are also firestops in the amphitheatre of seats in the galleries. All exterior openings leading to the yard are protected by standard fire doors and shutters. The auditorium is divided from the stage by a proscenium wall extending from the basement to above the roof. There are two openings in the proscenium wall in the basement and one on the first floor, besides the proscenium arch. All openings aside from the proscenium arch are protected by standard fire doors with automatic link attachments. The proscenium arch is protected by a fire curtain built of angle iron, filled in with blocks of petrified asbestos of 3-in. thickness, and both sides of the angle iron frame are closed by sheets of steel, which are bolted through the angle iron frames (with nuts on the other side) to prevent any buckling of the sheets of steel, in case of fire. Besides the usual fireproof curtain arrangements, the possibility of friction in raising and lowering the curtain is avoided by its sides running in steel channels. In case of lire, the curtain can be at once lowered automatically. The device consists of a rope attachment, with fusible links. When the fusible links melt, a weight drops, which will relieve a portion of the counterbalance weights, thus making the curtain so much heavier than the counterbalance weights that it will drop automatically. It contains, however, the same safety devices as on an elevator, to prevent the curtain dropping too quickly. If the curtain should not drop when required, a water curtain has been rigged above the proscenium arch, consisting of automatic sprinklers. This water-curtain is under pressure of 50 Ills, to the sq. in. from a supply of 17,000 gals, of water. The stage, with two fly-galleries of concrete arch, has all its structural iron work and roof-beams protected by terra-cotta. The dressingroom section contains a pump room and property room, and is divided by a brick wall, all openings to the stage being protected by fire doors, one on each side of the wall. All the dressing and other rooms are divided by fireproof partitions. with standard fire doors at the openings to each room. The paint-bridge on the stage and the gridiron arc of iron, and no repairs are done on the premises. Electricity alone serves to light the building throughout, the connection from Broadway and Sixty-fifth street being double. Electricity is used even to heat the curling irons in the dressing room. The fire appliances are the following: Four standpipes and 17 hose-connections in various parts of the stage, underneath the stage and in the auditorium, with 50 or too ft. of standard 2jd-in. hose at each. In addition, there are Siamese steamer-connections on the outside of the building. The standpipes are supplied by an electric pump drawing from a 5,000-gal. tank in a fireproof room in the basement, and a 5.000-gal. gravity-tank on the roof, and the equipment is supplied by a 7.500-gal. pressure tank. The electrical pump delivers 500 gals, of water per minute. The entire stage section is equipped with the most approved automatic sprinklers supplied by two sources—a 7.500-gal. pressure-tank on the rear and a l2,ooo-gal. gravity-tank on the roof: also outside steamer-connections. There are altogether 25,000 gals, of water available for immediate use on the premises, to sav nothing of barrels of water and the fire-pails distributed throughout the building (in the basement, first floor, fly-galleries and the dressingroom portion). Fire-extinguishers are likewise distributed throughout the stage portion and the auditorium, and axes, hooks and other small appliances are provided in abundance. There are two fire alarm boxes, one on the stage and one at the entrance to the theatre, and watchmen, with an Imperial clock of seven stations, make hourly rounds at nights, on Sundays and holidavs. In order, also, that there may be no water damage in the auditorium in case of fire, the doors slant slightly towards the yard, where there is a drain connected directly with the sewer to take off any water that may be used in case of fire.

A WELL PROTECTED THEATRE.

A WELL PROTECTED THEATRE.

Costly as was the Iroquois theatre disaster in Chicago in human life and suffering, a large benefit from it is being reaped in the construction of new amusement houses. One of these, the Majestic, in Brooklyn, New York, is soon to be opened for the first time. The theatre is bounded by open streets on two sides, and has a court and wealth of fire escapes on the third. 1 lie construction is of steel, and the stage and auditorium are practically two buildings. The fire wall is nearly six feet thick The asbestos curtain Is stretched on heavy gas piping and set into a steel dot in the arch r inning back ten inches. The top of the stage building is glass. In case of fire, the flames would ascend skyward, burning out the stage and scenery, hut would not injure the rest of the house.