ABOUT SERVICE PIPES.

ABOUT SERVICE PIPES.

The adoption of the least injurious, and at the same time the best wearing pipes for services has for a long time been constantly sought after by those in charge of waterworks distribution systems, but without any decision being arrived at as to the most acceptable material that ought to be used in its construction, so that a standard might be decided on. Galvanised iron, lead, wrought iron, cementlined, and other kinds of pipe are now used in various places at the choice of the superintendent, and for economical reasons; but the selections in many instances cannot be said to be satisfactory. Corrosion and other troubles, such as those affecting the taste and color of the water, and, in some cases, causing disease, are bound to occur, because of the selection of poor service pipe. A decided change for the better, however, has been made in late years in the manufacture of such pipe since the lead and tin-lined product was invented. This is a wrought iron pipe, so made that the lead lining acts the same as if the whole pipe were composed of that material. It is so carefully lined that the pipe may he cut and bent without disturbing the lead which is annealed to the inside by special machinery invented for that purpose. It is a clean, well made, and inexpensive article, which has met with much favor in a large number of water departments throughout the country. The sectional view of the pipe given herewith shows the principle used in its construction. The methods of making service connections at present in force are not conducive to bringing about the best results. Connections to the curb ought to be under the supervision of the waterworks superintendents; and not intrusted to any outside operator. It is well enough for the plumber to finish the job from that point, but he should not be allowed to tap any main. Until this practise is universally adopted, no waterworks official can be sure that injury will not be done to pipes, while they are being tapped by a clumsy or inexperienced outsider. Every water department ought to have competent men to do service tapping and setting. In that way, more satisfactory and reliable results would be obtained in these important branches of distribution. The waterworks associations ought to take this matter up, and decide upon a uniformity of action in connection with the adoption of service pipes and their connections. At the different conventions samples of lead and tin-lined pipe and joints made by the Lead-Lined Iron Pipe company, of Wakefield, Mass., are shown, and they invariably call forth favorable comment. There is no reason to doubt that, when superintendents discuss the question of service pipes, they must agree that a product of such merit is best suited to their needs, and should be used in the best interests of their consumers.

SECTION OF LEAD-LINED IRON PIPE.

Salem, Mass., is replacing its cement pipe with cast iron pipe.

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