ADDITIONAL WATER SUPPLY FOR LITTLE FALLS.

ADDITIONAL WATER SUPPLY FOR LITTLE FALLS.

Little Falls, N. Y., having concluded negotiations for the lands needed for the Spruce Creek additional water supply, the city now owns the lands bordering on, and below the Ives-Eaton pond for 1,000 feet, portions of one lot, and the whole of the lot which is destined to be the site for a large reservoir when required; also the right to dam and flow the Keller Fly, Crosby Fly, and Leipsic pond. A conduit from Spruce creek, a new stone dam and measuring weir, and a large storage reservoir, nine miles north of the Ives-Eaton pond, have been built. The reseivoir will secure the retention and storage of all the winter and spring storm water. A new stone dam directly in front of the old timber dam at the Ivc?Eaton pond, as also a sand filter bed of one acre in extent ate approaching completion. This will secure an abundant supply for years 10 come. The Little Falls Klondike reservoir has an area of 136 sixty eight one-hundredth acres. Depth of water at dam, twenty-five feet. Average depth over the entire reservoir, nineteen two-tenth feet, and has a storage capacity of 756.306,780 gallons. The reservoir can b* drawn down the entire depth of twenty-five feet at the dam, and from the area of the watershed it is believed that it will fill full every year. The new stone dam at the lves-Eaton pond is placed at the same elevation as the average of the present dam. but will have an increased spillway—being eighty ftet wide. It can safely be drawn down seven feet, and stores approximately 150,000,000 gallons of water at this depth. The stored storm water at these two reservoirs will give an additional supply of 3,000,000 gallons for 300 days, or 6,000,000 gallons for 150 days. The report |>oints out there is a popular notion prevailing among those who have never examined closely into the matter, that the water works are very largely run in the interest and for the benefit of the mill owners. This is an entirely erroneous impression. At the present rate of three cents per 1,000 gallons for all excess over schedule rates, as a matter of fact, the mills pay as much, or more, proportionately, than the domestic users in stores and dwellings. The mills and metered consumeis pay approximately one-quarter of the water rents, but use less than onequarter of the water. * * * The sums paid annually for excess meter rates [since 1888] are as follows; 1888, $1,325.66; 18S9, $1,958.75; i8yo, $1,820,03; 1891, $2 466,44 ; 1892. $382,32; 1893, $1,362,62 ; 1894. $1,420.98 ; 1895, $864 36 ; 1896, $1,379 05 i 1897, $2,458.90 ; or a total of $17,439.11 to January 1, 1898. Again, taking the last year, 1897, the schedule rates paid by all mills and consumers using meters were $2,860.39, and adding excess meter rates $2,458.90, makes a total of $5,319.29. wmle the total revenue for 1897 from all sources was $23550.51, or practically the mills and metet consumers paid one-quarter ot the revenue, while the records of meters showed a total consumption of 160,652.290 gallons, or for 300 working days 535.507 gallons per day. The average daily flow Irom Beaver creek is 2,000, 000 to 3,000.000 gallons daily,although in the summer months it has tun down as low as to I,coo,000 to 1.250.000 gallons per diem for a short period * * * Assuming a one-half-inch up under eighty pounds pressure and 100 feet of service, the daily discharge would be 11,088 gatlous for the twenty-four hours. There are over 6,000 taps of various kinds in use, and, assuming that one-sixth to one-fifth are leaking or allowed to run to waste during the summer months, if all were aggregated and represented—say, fifty half-inch taps in full blast, it would call for a daily waste of 554.400 gallons per diem, or more than the toUl amount used by all the mills and meter consumers.

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