Advantages of Meters and Filters

Advantages of Meters and Filters

A contemporary calls attention to the desirability of making ample provision in the capacity of filter plants for a rapid increase in consumption of water, following the introduction of filtration due to an increase in the number of people taking the city supply. It quotes two large cities in which the increase in water consumption following the placing in operation of filters has been so great that within a few mon_____hs thereafter the construction of additional filters has been planned. Still further evidence of the increased popularity of a puhlic water supply after filters have been constructed received front a north central city which had a population of 70,060 in 1910 is given to show why larger filters ought to be designed. The filtration plant of this city consists of twelve rapid sand filters of a combined normal rating of 12,000,000 gallons daily, three coagulating basins with a total capacity of 2,500,000 gallons, equivalent to five hours as a maximum period of sedimentation, a clear well having an available filtered water capacity of 1,750,000 gallons, six chemical solution tanks, arranged for feeding either iron and lime or alum as a coagulant and bleach for sterilization, and the usual wash water and sump pumps, air blower, etc.—in a word a thoroughly modern and efficient type of plant. The only criticism which attaches to the plant is its insufficient capacity. The plant is already Overtaxed, at times, although it has been in operation less than two full years.

The plant was placed in service in the spring of 1912 and it is interesting to note the number of new services installed per year before and after the plant was placed in operation. During the years 1909, 1910 and 1911, 563, 651 and 716 new services were installed, respectively. In 1913, the first year of the filter’s operation, 1,563 new services were installed and in 1913 the number of new services placed was 1,043. During the two years last named the total number of services in the city, which, of course, lias long had a public water supply, increased exactly one-third. The city in question is very inadequately metered. At the end of 1910 37 meters were in service and this number has been increased only to 53 meters at the end of 1913. There are no meters in service smaller than 1 inch and ordinary house services arc entirely unmetered. Meters, so far, have been installed only where it was thought that water was being wasted, as in factories, laundries, livery stables, etc. It should be added that the city intends to install meters quite generally from now on.

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