Akron’s Water and Sewerage System.

Akron’s Water and Sewerage System.

(From an Occasional Correspondent.)

AKRON, O., January 10.—By the terms of the contract between the city of Akron and the Akron Water-works Company, the former will have the right to purchase the entire waterworks plant at any time after July 1, 1891. Such a purchase by the city is deemed advisable, and the matter is being considerably agitated at present. There is no clause in the franchise which regulates the number of fire-plugs that shall be granted by the city, but it has been the custom of the waterworks committee to demand plugs at short distances for all extensions, and for each of these it is to receive a rental of $45 per annum. In all of these cases the city has been compelled to allow the plugs or deprive a portion of the citizens of water supply.

The present water supply is drawn from Summit Lake, which is situated in a valley of springs, and has the Ohio Canal for an outlet, and from large wells. The company is now prospecting for more well water, the supply being inadequate in warm weather, and is boring on the land surrounding its station in hopes of finding a new supply. The water has been frequently analyzed by Professor C. M. Knight of Buchtel College, and pronounced by him purer than the water in most wells of the city. The tariff of water rates used here is the same adopted by the city of Cleveland, and when the charge is governed by meter measure it is 1.2 mill per cubic foot for the first 50,000 cubic feet or less, and 1 mill for amount between 50,000 and 100,000 cubic feet.

Akron’s sewage flows into the Little Cuyahoga river, but not without the city limits. The outlet of the sewerage system is right in a thickly populated portion of the city, and citizens who are affected by this condition are loud in their complaints and demand immediate remedy. A proposition is now being considered to buy a large tract of land outside the corporation and there treat the sewage. Scarlet fever and diphtheria prevailed in portions of the city quite extensively before the sewerage system was perfected, but at present such cases are rare. There is complaint that portions of the sewers have been built improperly, and in part this is true, as was demonstrated last fall by a hard storm when thousands of dollars’ worth of property was ruined by the overflow. This is to be corrected

early in the coming spring.

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Akron’s Water and Sewerage System.

0

Akron’s Water and Sewerage System.

(From an Occasional Correspondent.)

AKRON, O., January 10.—By the terms of the contract between the city of Akron and the Akron Water-works Company, the former will have the right to purchase the entire waterworks plant at any time after July 1, 1891. Such a purchase by the city is deemed advisable, and the matter is being considerably agitated at present. There is no clause in the franchise which regulates the number of fire-plugs that shall be granted by the city, but it has been the custom of the waterworks committee to demand plugs at short distances for all extensions, and for each of these it is to receive a rental of $45 per annum. In all of these cases the city has been compelled to allow the plugs or deprive a portion of the citizens of water supply.

The present water supply is drawn from Summit Lake, which is situated in a valley of springs, and has the Ohio Canal for an outlet, and from large wells. The company is now prospecting for more well water, the supply being inadequate in warm weather, and is boring on the land surrounding its station in hopes of finding a new supply. The water has been frequently analyzed by Professor C. M. Knight of Buchtel College, and pronounced by him purer than the water in most wells of the city. The tariff of water rates used here is the same adopted by the city of Cleveland, and when the charge is governed by meter measure it is 1.2 mill per cubic foot for the first 50,000 cubic feet or less, and 1 mill for amount between 50,000 and 100,000 cubic feet.

Akron’s sewage flows into the Little Cuyahoga river, but not without the city limits. The outlet of the sewerage system is right in a thickly populated portion of the city, and citizens who are affected by this condition are loud in their complaints and demand immediate remedy. A proposition is now being considered to buy a large tract of land outside the corporation and there treat the sewage. Scarlet fever and diphtheria prevailed in portions of the city quite extensively before the sewerage system was perfected, but at present such cases are rare. There is complaint that portions of the sewers have been built improperly, and in part this is true, as was demonstrated last fall by a hard storm when thousands of dollars’ worth of property was ruined by the overflow. This is to be corrected

early in the coming spring.