ALBUQUERQUE, N. M. WATERWORKS

ALBUQUERQUE, N. M. WATERWORKS

Specially written for FIRE AND WATER ENGINEERING.

The system is direct and the reservoir is situated about one mile from the center of the city, and has a capacity of 3,500,000 gallons. It is cement and concrete-lined, surrounded with a high board fence, and is well kept. The elevation of the reservoir is about 215 feet above the centre of the city, and affords a good domestic and fire pressure on all parts of the system. There are about twenty miles of water main from five-inch to fourteen-inch in diameter, which are converse, lock-joint pipe, kalamcined and asphalted, and about three miles of smaller mains—mostly galvanised wrought iron pipe from two-inch to four-inch in diameter. An abundant supply of well arranged valves makes it possible to isolate any part of the system to make repairs or extensions. without interfering with service, except in the immediate area affected. The fire hydrants arc mostly of the l.udlow pattern -with five-inch and six-inch connections to the mains, and each has two two and a half-inch nozzles. A considerable part of the kalamcined mains from fiveinch to fourteen-inch was laid in 188-1-5, when the plant was originally installed, and, in a recent rigid investigation by an expert employed by the city council to appraise and investigate the condition of the plant, with a view to its being purchased by the city, it was found that the entire plant, including the mains, was in remarkably good condition. The exterior of the mains showed practically no signs of deterioration on any part of the system, and, on most parts examined, even the mains installed in 1884-5 were, to all appearances, as good as when laid. The investigation of the interior condition of the mains showed that all the pipe was coated with a very thin glaze of lime or magnesia deposit, which appears to preserve the metal. It was also found that the mains were entirely free from tubercular, or other interior growths often found in waterworks distributing systems. The pumping equipment is composed of three separate units. The main unit is a Holly-Gaskill, compound pumping engine of 3,000.000-gaHon capacity. operating, condensing, and shows at this writing a duty of nearly 100,000.000 foot-pounds per 1000 pounds of steam. This engine is about as good as when installed, and, in view of the fact that it has been operated a great deal of the time since then (1885), it shows a fine record. The other units are smaller, and are at present used as auxiliary pumps. They are one Laidlaw it Dunn, compound duplex, of 2,000,000-gallon capacity, and otic Deane, triplex, of 1.500,000gallon capacitythe latter being operated with an electric motor. All the pumps are located in pits below the natural water level in the ground, and of sufficient depth, so that the cylinders are submerged when the pumps arc started. The pits are stone-walled and plastered inside with cement. All the suction-lines are depressed—in some cases fifteen feet below the natural water level (in quick sand I, and, although somewhat expensive—the construction is verv satisfactory. Steam is generated bv one 150-horsepower internallv fired, return-flue boiler, with Morrison corrugated furnace, made by the Springfield Boiler works, Springfield, Ill. and has proved a very efficient steamer, ft is intended to duplicate this boiler at an early day. The pumping station is centrally located, on the line of the A. T. & S, F. railway. on a lot’400 feet by 800 feet, which is surrounded by a stone wall. The buildings are brick and artificial stone (cement blocks), with brick and cement floors, a coal track, with scale, and a pushcar running from the coalhouse to the boilerroom, and other convenient facilities for economical operation. This valley through which the Rio Grande finds its way to the Gulf, contains an inexhaustible supply of water. Beginning ten feet below the surface of the ground at the pumping station, there are alternate water-bearing strata of quicksand and gravel ten feet to twentylive feet through, and divided by similar strata of non-water-bearing clay. The wells of the water company are three, four, six, eight, ten and twelve inches in diameter, ninety to 700 feet deep, tapping strata, as explained above, and furnish an abundant supply of clear, pure and wholesome water. The consumption of water for the past year has been about 2,000,000 gallons daily, which, at the estimated population of 12,000 people, is equal to 166 gallons daily per capita. This consumption varies, being more than 200 gallons in summer during the irrigating period to a little over too gallons during the winter season. There are over 1,400 services, over 300 of which were installed last year, which show’ed an increase of over thirty per cent, in 1905, with abundant indications that the present year will show a greater increase than last year. The services are about forty per cent, metered, and it is intended largely to increase the number of meters this year, with a view of finally having all services metered. Little work was done last year in the way of extending the system; but the rapid growth of the city will require considerable extending of the mains to supply districts already built up, which are clamoring for service, and to afford fire protection, as ordered by the city council. Part of this work is under way; considerable material is being ordered, or in transit, and additional orders are being placed as rapidly as is possible.

PUMPING STATION, ALBUQUERQUE, N. M.

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