American Water Works Convention

American Water Works Convention

The Fortieth Annual Convention of the American Water Works Association has now passed into history, and no one who had the privilege of attending that record meeting of the association will return to his home city without taking back with him lasting benefits in the way of information gained from some of the very practical papers read and illustrated at the session and the discussion of them; from the swapping of experiences with other members of the association; from the rubbing of elbows with men who have had the same problems and experiences as himself. These were the practical advantages derived, but there were others, too. Many strong friendships will date from the Montreal meeting. Many men, who before June 21 did not know that some other individual even existed, will remember the convention as the starting point of a friendship that will last through the years. This, and the renewing of former acquaintanceships, are perhaps among the pleasantest features of the convention. While there may have been differences of opinion as to policy, as is quite natural in so large a body, the results of such differences were adjusted amicably, it is hoped, and a better understanding, we are sure, will result from the frank, yet courteous, expression of opinion which characterized the meetings.

One of the most important matters, perhaps, brought before the convention came up at the Wednesday and Thursday sessions—that of standardization of water purification; of meters, and of brass goods in connection with services. The latter was signalized by a very illuminative address by Adolph Mueller, of H. Mueller & Co., who showed very clearly the many advantages that would accrue through the getting together of the association and the manufacturers of these goods, and the great saving in time and expense that would be the result of the adoption of such standards. Mr. Mueller’s paper will be published in full in a later issue of FIRE AND WATER ENGINEERING.

If there was anything to criticize in the arrangement of the program, it might have been the lack of time allowed for the discussion of several of the papers. This undoubtedly was the result of the length of the program, which might be termed a good fault, but nevertheless it is rather unfortunate that many of the members who were anxious to talk on the various papers were unable to do so, as this spontaneous discussion by men on the “firing line” is one of the greatest advantages of a gathering of this kind. However, this omission was probably unavoidable.

Taken all in all, the Montreal Convention of the American Water Works Association can be considered not only successful but a record one of which the association has good reason to be proud.

American Water Works Convention

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American Water Works Convention

W. H. Van Winkle, chairman of the transportation committee of the Water Works Manufacturers’ Association, has made arrangements for special railroad accommodations for those desiring to go from New York City and vicinity to the convention of the American Water Works Association at St. Louis May 13 to 17. Mr. Van Winkle invites early applications for accommodations, saying in his announcement: “We are informed by the United States Government that all sleeping cars transferring from one railroad to another must have its full complement of passengers—that is, all upper berths as well as lower ones must be occupied or sold—so first come, first served.” Mr. Van Winkle announces that the New York delegation’s special reservation will be the second section of the Black Diamond express on the Lehigh Valley railroad and will leave West Twenty-third street, New York City, on May 11 at 8:50 a. m. and will leave Liberty street at 9:00 a. m. The train will leave Newark at 9:36 a. m., and is due to arrive in Buffalo at 8:15 p. m.,. leaving by the Big Four train of the New York Central line at 11 p. m. Train leaving the Reading terminal in Philadelphia, Pa., at 9:15 a. m. will connect with the main party at South Bethlehem, Pa. Those desiring to make reservations for the trip should address Mr. Van Winkle at 50 Church street, New York. Delegates from Philadelphia, Atlantic City, Reading, Harrisburg, Norristown, Washington, Wilmington and Baltimore can connect via the Philadelphia & Reading railroad at Philadelphia. Delegates from Philadelphia, etc., may apply to Mr. Van Winkle for reservations. Parties located in Buffalo, Syracuse, Rochester, and F.rie, Pa., can communicate with Mr. L. S. Barnard, of the Hersey Manufacturing Company, in Buffalo. For the convenience of delegates Mr. Van Winkle announces the following rates from New York City: Individual fare, including war tax, $23.49; party fares, ten or more persons in one party ticket, per capita, $22.19; Pullman fares (tax included), lower berth, $6.60; upper berth, $5.28; compartment, $17.60; drawing room, $23.10. Rates from Philadelphia are as follows: Individual fare, including war tax, $22.95; party fares, ten or more persons on one party ticket, per capita, $21.79; Pullman fares (tax included), lower berth, $6.05; upper berth, $4.84; compartment, $17.05; drawing room, $22.-