AMOSKEAG ENGINE AT RICHMOND.

AMOSKEAG ENGINE AT RICHMOND.

The new fire engine for the Richmond fire department that arrived a few days ago was given its trial tests yesterday afternoon at 4 o’clock at Ninth street and the Basin Bank. The engine is the Amoskeag, 1906 pattern third-size, with a capacity of 600 gals, a minute. It was made by the American Locomotive company, at Manchester. N. H., for the International Power company, and was tested here yesterday in the presence of the board of fire commissioners and Chief Puller. The test was very satisfactory. With 2 1/2-in. hose, 100 ft. in length, 1 5/8-in. nozzle, the engine maintained an average of 110 lbs. of steam, with an average water-pressure of 210 lbs., for an hour’s run. The engine was accepted by the commissioners at once. The company was represented by Geo. G. Tidsbury, of Boston, Mass., who made the sale to the city Harry Morrill, of Manchester, N. H., was the delivering engineer. The new engine will be placed in commission in engine company No. 8. Fulton, and will be in charge of Engineer Thos. H. Weimer, of the Richmond fire department. The commissioners present at the test were John Frischkorn (president); G. Watt Taylor (vicepresident): and Messrs. L. C. Perkins, Robert Lecky. jr., Jos. L. Levy and T. Moncure Perkins. They all ex-, pressed themselves as entirely satisfied with the performance of the machine. The engine is finished with Russia iron jackets and nickel-plated dome, bands and trimmings. Surmounted on it is a large locomotive-style bell, which is different from any signal bell now on any of the Richmond fire apparatus. A very amusing accident happened to President John Frischkorn while the test was being made, and which might have resulted seriously. As it was, Mr. Frischkorn simply had, as he said, his usual fire-luck, He was standing near the nozzle of the stream admiring it. when the men handling it in some manner let it get away from them, and the stream, about 200 lbs. water pressure, hit the president and knocked him down and rolled him over. He came up serenely smiling and was the rest of the evening explaining how it all happened. The crowd was convulsed with laughter, and, although Saptain Frischkorn got a good ducking, the weather was warm, and he seemed to enjoy the situation as much as anyone else, and said he was used to it—that he gets a “similar dose every time he goes to a fire.”—The Times-Despatch, Richmond, Va.

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