AN APPRECIATION OF FILTRATION.

AN APPRECIATION OF FILTRATION.

In an article in the Kansas City, Kans. “Globe,” C. W. McLaughlin, health commissioner of that city, speaks highly of the city water furnished there and of filtration for the prevention of typhoid. In the article Commissioner McLaughlin said in part: “Nothing is more vital to the health, the vigor, the productiveness of a community than pure water, and nothing is more readily within our reach, if the citizens will assist in obtaining it. The ancient Romans recognized this fact when they built aqueducts to the far off hills and mountains for their water supply. When visiting the enternal city it was exceedingly interesting to me to see a portion of the famous ‘Aquiducts of Claudius’ built over 2,000 years, still standing. While all the established facts point to the vital necessity for clean and wholesome water supply for every municipality. What are we doing and what can we do to insure such a supply to every part of our city? An example of what has been accomplished by a purified water has been demonstrated by the city of Lawrence, Mass., in 1893. Up to then the death rate from typhoid fever was 10 to 12 per 10,000 population. After establishing an efficient filtering water plant the death rate per 10,000 was reduced to nothing. The manner in which the municipal water of our city has been treated today is undoubtedly the safest and purest and most wholesome water that can be had. It is practically germ free, that is, free from pathogenic or disease germs. I have lived in Kansas City, Kans. for seventeen years and our municipal water now is the best it has ever been, thanks to our present commissioner of water and lighting. Our city, like all others in this climate, has typhoid fever in sporadic form. That is to say there arc scattering cases all the year round. But during the time I have served the city as health commissioner not one case of typhoid fever have I been able to trace the origin of infection to our hydrant water. Most invariably the homes where the fever prevails, the occupants drink water from cisterns, wells or springs. Cistern water furnishes by far the largest number of cases. From a health standpoint the city would be better off by far if there wasn’t a cistern, well or spring within its limits, out of which water is taken for drinking purposes. To supply every household with city water is an economic question. A single case of sickness in the home caused by impure drinking water is more expensive than the cost of Connecting up the ho^e with hydrant water.”

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