AN AUTOMATIC LUBRICATOR.

AN AUTOMATIC LUBRICATOR.

A contemporary gives the following description of the new lubricator manufactured by J. L. Robertson and Sons, of 925 Fulton street, New York:

“The lubricator here shown is to be attached to any reciprocating or oscillating parts of engines or machinery requiring constant and reliable lubrication, as the crossheads, connecting rods, eccentric straps, etc., of engines, pumps, air-compressors, etc As it feeds grease instead of oil, it may be attached in any position desired—feeding vertically upwards or downwards, horizontally or at any angle desired. It feeds only when the part to which it is attached is in motion, and no feeding or loss can occur after the motion ceases The base of the lubricator is screwed firmly into the part to be lubricated in the usual way. The body is attached to the base by the union nut or enlarged ring at the bottom. When this is unscrewed, the upper part is all taken off together; the barrel is filled with a charge of grease, and returned and securely clamped in the position again by the union nut. The feeding is accomplished by the pressure of the piston, and this pressure is applied by the vibrations of the pendulum seen in the front. By the adjustment of the stop-screw’s at the side, the pawl attached to the pendulum may be made to take from one to six or more teeth of the rachet wheel for each vibration. On the rachet wheel shaft is a worm, which meshes into the large worm wheel at the top. The central screw or spindle is spindled and revolves with this wheel at the same time that it travels downwards by the operation of its thread in the central nut, which is screwed into the bracket or guide at the top. The feeding goes on if the vibrations continue, until the piston reaches the bottom, and the grease is all expelled.

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