AN EFFICIENT PIPE-CUTTER.

AN EFFICIENT PIPE-CUTTER.

The difficulty of pipe-cutting may be said to be solved by the introduction of a very convenient, light, easily worked and reliable machine just placed upon the market and known as the Ellis-Ford pipe cutter. It is surprising to notice how quickly and with how little effort it performs its work. As shown in the illustration herewith, the cutter is a frame containing a screw-operated yoke, which provides a means of tightening the series of links carrying the cutter wheels. The frame is also provided with two cutting wheels, which come in contact with the pipe, whereby all pivotal lost motion is prevented. A series of links carrying cutterwheels, which links are proporti -ned to the difference in circumference of the . arious sizes of pipes, and, being detachable, are connected to each other and to the ends of the tightening yoke by thumb-bolts and nuts, whereby a change may be made from one size pipe to any other within the range of cutters with no other tools than the hands of the operator. To operate the cutter it is placed in position on the pipe, and an oscillating motion is imparted by the handle, which also serves to tighten up the links carrying the cutting wheels. All the motion required is to make one of the wheels in the frame cover half the distance to the cutting wheel in the first link, the other half being taken up when the handle is thrown in the opposite direction. The machine is so easily operated that one man may work it and make a cut in an eight-inch pipe from two and onehalf to three minutes—smaller sizes in less time. When the diameter of pipe to be cut is determined, the links are arranged to suit by taking out or adding those which are necessary. The cutter is then placed on the pipe, and, without further adjusting or loss of time, the cut is made. No room is taken up in the ditch, only sufficient to allow the cutters to work on the lower side of the pipe. The shape of tiie steel wheel-cutter increases from a sharp point to an extended centre, so that, when a certain point is reached in cutting, the cut end of the pipe is forced off. leaving an edge so clean that it can be joined, if necessary, without loss of time. Thin and brittle soil pipe is as easily operated on with like satisfactory results. An ordinary cutter weighs only fifty pounds. To sum up the merits of this machine: It may be mentioned further that the links carrying the cutting wheels are proportioned to the difference in the sizes of pipe to be cut, and are interchangeable. There is no lost motion in the operation of the cutter, as is the case with the Hall machine, which has one cutter on the block, which causes the movement of the handle to pivot on that point and the links to bind on the pipe. The Ellis-Ford cutter has two cutting wheels on the main frame, which prevents all lost motion; every movement of the handle causes a corresponding movement of the cutting wheels; and every point in contact with the pipe is a cutting wheel, which reduces the power required to operate it. By reason of the greater number of cutting wheels, the usefulness of the machine is increased, as it can be operated in less space, or in trenches where there is rock or timber, or in any other place. The No. 1 machine illustrated will cut all sizes of cast iron, wrought iron or steel pipe from four to twelve inches, diameter inclusive. The cutter is sold by the Ellis-Ford Pipe Cutter company, of Great Falls, Mont., and is manufactured by the Knickerbocker Machine Works, 12 Jones street, Manhattan, New York.

C. B. Briggs appointed chief of the Penn Yati, N. Y., fire department.

No posts to display