AN ENGLISH BARRACKS.

AN ENGLISH BARRACKS.

The new Central Fire Brigade Station at Birmingham is conveniently situated, and will be easy of access from all parts of the town. The Station buildings, when finished, will comprise a residence for the Superintendent of the Brigade, houses for the Assistant Superintendent and for the Firemen and their families, an office and other rooms, a large Engine-house, ample stabling accommodations, workshops, a large drill-ground, and stores for drying the hose. The Superintendent’s residence fronts the street. It will be a handsome-looking building, faced with red brick, and ornamented with stone and tera cotta dressings. To the right of the house is a wide gateway leading to the drill-ground, which is about one hundred and fifty-three feet long and forty feet wide. Between the gateway and the house is an entrance to the Superintendent’s office. Beyond this is the Fireman’s waiting-room, and still further at the rear, running at right angles from the street, a row of houses for the Firemen is being erected. The houses are planned according to the flat system. On the ground floor there are to be three residences, each having a living-room and two bedrooms. A semi-circular open staircase is provided to give access to the flats, and on the first floor there will be four residences, one being formed over the Firemen’s waiting-room [and office, and three of these residences will have two bedrooms, and one of them four bedrooms. The plan of residences on the second floor will be precisely the same as that on the first floor. On the top of the residence it is intended to form a flat and erect five wash-houses, the remainder of the flat being used as a drying-ground, or playground for children, and the whole of the flat will be enclosed with iron palisades. The plan includes a separate lock-up cellar for each of the_residences on the basement floor.

The Engine-house lies to the right of the yard, facing the houses, and will afford sufficient space for six Engines. Its dimensions are seventy-five feet by seventeen feet, and the walls are all faced with white glazed bricks. A wash-house will be provided for the purpose of washing the hose, and there is to be a lofty roomfor drying it. There is also a workshop, and further to the rear are the stables, which will furnish accommodations for six horses. On the first floor, over the Enginehouse, there will be suitable workshops, a large store-room, and a reserveroom for the Firemen when not engaged in active duty. Close by there will be a residence for the Assistant Superintendent, and two bath-rooms will be provided, and so arranged that they may be used by the families of the Superintendent and the Firemen without passing through the other rooms. The yard will be covered partly with granite and partly with asphalt. The establishment promises to be one of the finest in the country. The cost of the work is estimated at £20,000. Prior to the laying of the comer stone, the Fire Brigade, under the direction of Superintendent Tozer, formed a procession with the Steam Engine and two Manual Engines, and headed by the police band, under the conductorship of Mr. Bell, proceeded to the Upper Priory. The Harborne Fire Brigade, under Captain Hart, attended with their Engine. Superintendent Tozer, on behalf of the Fire Brigade, presented Alderman Deykin with a beautifully engraved silver trowel, bearing an appropriate inscription, remarking that he trusted when the new buildir gs were erected they would be the meins of further developing the Fire Brigade and increasing its efficiency (hear, hear). Alderman Deykin expressed his thanks for the present, and his appreciation of the feeling which it manifested on the pat* of the Brigade. Having laid the stone, Alderman Deykin gave an interesting account of the rise and progress of the Birmingham Fire Brigade, and, after a vote of thanks had been passed to the worthy Alderman for his attendance, the proceedings terminated.—London Fireman.

No posts to display