An Improved Conveyor.

An Improved Conveyor.

The application of machinery to the transportation of coal, dirt and small substances has been given another step forward by the Link Belt Machinery Co. of Chicago. The accompanying illustration shows the conveyor in operation at the coaling station of the Chicago and West Michigan R. R. at New Buffalo, Mich., where some 75 locomotives are supplied daily with 100 tons of coal. In ordinary service the coal is shoveled from the cars at the foot of the incline, onto an apron, where it falls directly to the conveyor, and is carried to the coal pockets. If these pockets are full the coal is shoveled into a storage bin on the ground, with a capacity of about 600 tons. This bin is of timber, 130 feet long, 14 feet 3 inches deep and 24 feet 4 inches wide on top, the sides sloping inward to a bottom width of 8 feet. Along the whole length of the bottom is a conveyor box 4 feet wide and 2 feet deep, covered with loose boards, and when the storage supply is to be drawn upon, some of these boards are removed, allowing the coal to fall into the conveyor box. The conveyor is about q feet below the level of the top of the rail and from the end of the bin the conveyor rises at an angle of about 20 degrees to the coaling shed, 80 feet distant, where it is 26 feet above the track on which the engines stand while coaling. Through the building, which is 60 feet long, the conveyor passes above the coaling pockets from which the coal is discharged into the tenders. The conveyor consists of a chain carrying steel scrapers or blades, which move in a steel lined trough. The chain is of the Dodge pattern, with links not directly in contact with each other, but having malleable iron wearing blocks, which prevent wear of the chain itself and can easily be renewed. In the carrying direction the blades are on the under side of the chain, which passes over a wheel at the end of the bin and the end of the building, the returning part of the chain being supported at intervals by sprocket wheels or idlers carried in overhead frames. The conveyor is driven by a rope transmission arrangement, a manilla rope inches diameter being used. This is placed a little distance beyond the end of the building, and drives the 36-inch over which the chain passes at the end of its course.

Doring’s famous band has already been engaged by the Read Company of Troy to accompany them to the State firemen’s convention to be held at Coney Island next year.

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