AN INSIDIOUS INCENDIARY.

AN INSIDIOUS INCENDIARY.

Last week we alluded to the fact that the rubber works of Candee & Co., at New Haven, were burned while a number of city officials and members of the Fire Department were being shown around the establishment. It now appears that the building had recently been supplied with a quantity of new fire annihilators, and it was for the purpose of showing how effectually they would put out fires, and how absolutely safe the establishment was from destruction by fire that tho visitors were invited to be prosent at the time. During the experiments that were mudo with tho tiro extinguishers, the flames got beyond the control of tho expel imentors, and tho building and contents wore destroyed. The much lauded extinguishers didn’t extinguish so much as was expected, but, on tho contrary, wore IhomsolvoH consumed in tho flames. In this instance, fire extinguishers boeamo incendiaries, and those who had trusted so implicitly to thorn, boeamo thoir victims. It is understood that the insurance companies refuse to pay the insurances on the property destroyed, on the ground that tho proprietors were incendiaries, who caused the destruction of their premises while bunglingly conducting uncalled for and unnecessary experiments.

There aro certain fire extinguishers j that aro unquestionably good to have, j and are of value in tho extinguishment of incipient fires when in the hands of trained men, whose experience in fire matters directs them how to use them to advantage. But unless controlled by such trained men, fire extinguishers aro I of little use. When we read accounts j of how much money has been expended to provide exposed buildings with fire appliances of this kind, we always regret that the money expended was not used for improving the regular Fire Departments of the citios in which such build -, ings are located. The best fire protection private parties can secure for their property, is to provide ample means for the Firemen to use on occasions of fire, and to afford them the easiest and quickest access to the fire itself. They make a business of fighting fire, and, very naturally, know the best moans of doing their work quickly; being trained in tho use of iiro appliances, they are not likely to so direct them as to destroy the property they are expected to guard, as was done at New Haven. While we sympathise with Candee & Co. in their loss, we cannot but reflect that if they had sought to make the Fire Department of their city as perfect as possible, and relied upon that for protection instead of filling their buildings with “medicated squirts,” as we have heard fire extinguishers denominated, they would not now be called upon to mourn the loss of their property. The true insurance of every community against losses by fire, lies in the maintainance of the most efficient Fire Department that can be obtained, equipped with the best apparatus ; to be found.

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