An Interesting Fire Test.

An Interesting Fire Test.

Terra cot a for fireproofing does not appear to be as extensively used in England as has been the case here, observes Architecture and Building. We note that special mention is made of an experiment made last month at Bishop’s Waltham Hants. The experiment was made in a little building of the dimensions of one room of an ordinary house, with brick sides and a terra cotta floor above, the pieces being so dovetailed as to render it almost hermetically staled. This floor was reached by means of a wide staircase, with an ornamental balustrade, resembling that of carved oak. In the room below faggots of wood were piled up to the ceiling. Round these at the bottom were placed tar barrels, with a layer of straw. The inass was set on fire, and the fire burnt with great intensity. While this was going on most of the visitors ascended the staircase and stood on the floor, feeling the slabs from time to time to see if the heat was making any impression on them, but throughout the whole trial they maintained almost the same temperature, being quite cold. By-and-by the fierce flames lapped themselves round the staircase, cutting off retreat by that way, and had it been composed of wood short work would have been made of it. However, beyond being slightly blackened by smoke, it remained as impassive as the floor above. The room was one mass of white heat, resembling in color molten lead. Had the floor fallen in at that time cremation would have been the fate of those on it. The party remained on the roof from half to three-quarters of an hour sufficient period to put the experiment to the severest test—and so little had they felt the heat below that many shivered with cold. Immediately the visitors descended, a large number of the workmen and boys ran up the stairs and jumped about on the floor, which apparently had not in any way been affected by the great heat, though the fire continued to burn for a considerable time afterward.

AN ENGINE THAT IS A “Jonah.”—Railroad men at McKeesport say locomotive No. 166, now being used in the Pittsburg yards of the P. V. & C. Road is a “Jonah.” Says The Pittsburg Post : “ During the by no means extended career of that engine it has killed six men and wounded seven others. In addition to this the engine began ‘ sulking,’ in engineers’ parlance, and was abandoned by her crew. Another team was put on the unlucky engine, and last night she ground up an unknown man at Ornsby. His remains had hardly been gathered up when the engine ‘ sulked ‘ and then cut off a brakeman’s hand. She was sent to the shops, where she broke down a trestle the very first thing. Her fires were drawn and she is now comparatively harmless. Several men at McKeesport say it is as much as a man’s life is woith to tackle No. :66 when in one of her moods.”

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